• In  Seeking History Through Her Source: South of the Vindhyas (Orient BlackSwan), edited by Aloka Parasher Sen, authors seek historical realities south of the Vindhyas, and contextualise oft-neglected sources in their respective local niches. They highlight literary, art-historical and archaeological sources—such as the Jātakas, Cankam literature, Kāvya narratives and coins—while also highlighting fragmentary sources. 
  • Post-COVID 19, the world has to be studied in terms of what it is, not what it should have been. India’s foreign policy framework needs resilience and flexibility to overcome geopolitical storms. Taking note of realities, Madhav Das Nalapat spells out how India can take advantage of opportunities in  75 Years of Indian Foreign Policy: War, Peace and a World Realigned (Rupa).  
  • Characters navigate the depths of life by questioning its very existence in Manu Bhattahiri’s  The Greatest Enemy of Rain (Aleph). In 14 short stories, oddballs grapple with matters of life and death, examine newfound freedoms, love, longing and memories of days gone by. 
  • Namrata Poddar deconstructs boundaries in her debut novel,  Borderless (Harper). The protagonist, Dia, feels like she does not belong in the U.S., but she also cannot connect with her roots in India. With the American Dream in the background, she attempts to figure out her life while negotiating with intergenerational voices.