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The View from India | Turbulent neighbourhood

Understand international affairs from the Indian perspective with View from India

April 12, 2022 08:32 am | Updated April 13, 2022 09:08 am IST

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Political turbulence continued for two of India’s most important neighbours last week. While Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan was forced to step down after losing a no confidence vote in Parliament, Sri Lanka’s President Gotabaya Rajapaksa stubbornly remains in power, despite surging public protests against his government, calling for his resignation.

Opposition parties supporters celebrate the dismissed Pakistan’s Prime Minister Imran Khan in Karachi on April 10, 2022.

Opposition parties supporters celebrate the dismissed Pakistan’s Prime Minister Imran Khan in Karachi on April 10, 2022. | Photo Credit: AFP

This explainer by our Diplomatic Affairs Editor Suhasini Haidar on the trust vote in Pakistan, and this recap tells us what led to Pakistan’s political conundrum. “While Saturday’s events may finally draw the curtains on the political thriller and usher in a new government, the final verdict on Mr. Khan’s seemingly reckless and unprecedented actions will probably only be sounded when the country next goes to the polls,” said The Hindu’s editorial.

Protestors take part in a demonstration in Colombo on April 9, 2022.

Protestors take part in a demonstration in Colombo on April 9, 2022. | Photo Credit: AFP

Sri Lanka, on the other hand, is in the midst of a worsening economic crisis, further compounded by a political stalemate. In the latest reflection of how dire the situation is, Sri Lankan doctors have sought urgent medical supplies to save newborns – read our report. As the country’s current plunges, Sri Lankans are bracing for more shortages this month. Meanwhile, the political impasse continues, with citizens demanding that the Rajapaksa quit office, and the Opposition refusing to form an interim government under Mr. Gotabaya. Though the weekend, protestors occupied Colombo’s sea front, and are continuously agitating in front of the Presidential Secretariat. See updates and visuals from the spot. Also read The Hindu’s Editorial on the escalating crisis that said “nothing short of the resignation of the Rajapaksa brothers will assuage public anger”.

Top Five

  1. Ukraine and the anatomy of India’s neutrality – our Foreign Editor Stanly Johny writes on how Nehru’s axiom continues guiding New Delhi’s approach to conflicts, especially those involving its partners.
  2. A year of change: This November, the top leaders of the Communist Party of China will gather in Beijing for their once-in-five-year National Congress. The stakes are high for General Secretary and President Xi Jinping, who will mark 10 years at the helm and begin a third five-year term – Ananth Krishnan writes on a pivotal moment for China.
  3. Repairing the complex India-Nepal relationship: Former diplomat Rakesh Sood calls for sensitivity and generosity from India for its “neighbourhood first” policy to take root.
  4. India, Mexico have different ways to arrive at same point on Russia, the Mexican Foreign Minister told us in this exclusive interview.
  5. Beyond Border-Gavaskar: The Hindu’s Editorial on the India-Australia trade agreement.

U.S. Watch

President Joe Biden meets virtually with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi in the South Court Auditorium on the White House campus in Washington, April 11, 2022. India’s Defense Minister Rajnath Singh, is center, and India’s Foreign Minister Subrahmanyam Jaishankar, is right.

President Joe Biden meets virtually with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi in the South Court Auditorium on the White House campus in Washington, April 11, 2022. India’s Defense Minister Rajnath Singh, is center, and India’s Foreign Minister Subrahmanyam Jaishankar, is right. | Photo Credit: AP

China Watch

Residents line up for nucleic acid test during a lockdown to curb the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Shanghai, China April 9, 2022.

Residents line up for nucleic acid test during a lockdown to curb the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Shanghai, China April 9, 2022. | Photo Credit: Reuters

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