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Chandrayaan-3 launch | Indian-origin CEOs in Silicon Valley are over the moon

Some of the top representatives of the Silicon Valley companies echoed the sentiment that the successful launch of the lunar mission signalled the emergence of India as global leader

July 15, 2023 01:13 pm | Updated 08:45 pm IST - Bengaluru

Chandrayaan-3 lifts off from the second launch pad at Satish Dhawan Space Centre-SHAR, Sriharikota in Andhra Pradesh on Friday.

Chandrayaan-3 lifts off from the second launch pad at Satish Dhawan Space Centre-SHAR, Sriharikota in Andhra Pradesh on Friday. | Photo Credit: B. Jothi Ramalingam

The successful launch of Chandrayaan-3 got the top leadership of start-ups and big companies with Indian roots in Siicon valley thumping their chest with pride and looking at what lies ahead for India.

Some of the top representatives of the Silicon Valley companies echoed the sentiment that the successful launch of the lunar mission signalled the emergence of India as global leader in key areas of the technology sector.

An entrepreneur, engineer and venture capitalist Bipul Sinha who co-founded the multi-cloud data control company Rubrik headquartered at Palo Alto in Silicon Valley told PTI, "Chandrayaan is such a proud moment for India as well as every Indian origin person everywhere across the world."

Watch | All you need to know about Chandrayaan-3 mission

Also Read | Chandrayaan-3 | ‘Over the moon’: praises pour in across party lines

He said, "The implication of Chandrayaan is not just landing on the moon, but it is the technology and inspiration that India is showing to everybody as to what the future could be. How we own the technology future and propel India into the technology future. This will be a huge catalyst to the Indian economy, Indian innovation and overall Indian diaspora across the world."

Arvind Jain, CEO Glean AI said, "India is now part of the core innovation engine for all companies in the world. All the years of investment done in India in an amazing number of educational institutions and the number of engineers who graduate every year have resulted in India being the future of tech talent and R&D talent.

My belief is that we will see a lot more startups and a lot more innovation happening. Unicorns and large multinational companies will actually be born and grow in India and then become multinationals."

Umesh Sachdev, Co Founder and CEO of Silicon Valley based Conversational AI company Uniphore said Chandrayaan-3 marked the coming of age of India's science and technology capabilities.

Mr. Sachdev said, "It was a big milestone from a global and Indian aerospace industry standpoint. I think what yesterday represented was the coming of age of Indian science and tech. India is not just going to be a follower or be a back office to the companies of the west and developed technologies. India can start to lead in specific industries.

And the successful launch of Chandrayaan mission on Friday is a prime example that India is leading the world in certain areas like low cost innovation, high impact innovation. India is showing the world in some places how the playbook can be written."

Connecting the successful launch of Chandrayaan-3 to the recent visit of Prime Minister Narendra Modi to the U.S., Sahil Chawla, CEO and Founder of Tsecond, a data-tech innovation startup, said "the optics are changing."

California-based Mr. Chawla said: "I think India made history in the afternoon of July 14 at a cost of less than 100 million dollars which is ₹670 odd crore. We are going to the Moon as a country. It is a game changer for all the space sectors in the world. After Prime Minister Modi came here [U.S.] the optics have changed. Any industry, even Indian Americans are looking for new AI which is America India. It is very important that this kind of success comes in."

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