Data | Economic hardships aside, erosion of democracy in Sri Lanka a key reason for public anger

While democratic values in Sri Lanka were on the ascent in the post-war phase, they declined rapidly since the constitutional crisis in 2018

Updated - July 12, 2022 05:12 pm IST

Published - July 11, 2022 07:31 pm IST

Protesters stand holding a national flag at the President Gotabaya Rajapaksa’s office on the second day after it was stormed in Colombo, Sri Lanka amid the economic crisis in the country. AP/PTI(AP07_11_2022_000113A)

Protesters stand holding a national flag at the President Gotabaya Rajapaksa’s office on the second day after it was stormed in Colombo, Sri Lanka amid the economic crisis in the country. AP/PTI(AP07_11_2022_000113A) | Photo Credit: ERANGA JAYAWARDENA

In a show of fury against the worsening economic situation, protesters in Sri Lanka stormed the Presidential Secretariat on Saturday and set ablaze the private residence of the Prime Minister. In 2021, the island nation had the best Human Development Index (HDI) among nations in the Indian subcontinent and the second-best GDP per capita. Its descent into chaos in recent months is mostly a consequence of financial mismanagement and erratic policy decisions. The rapid erosion of democratic values in recent years is also a reason for the display of public anger. While democratic values were on the ascent in the post-war phase, they declined rapidly since the constitutional crisis in 2018

Charts appear incomplete? Click to remove AMP mode

Democratic values

The graph shows the gains made after the end of the civil war in 2009 (yellow) and the losses following the constitutional crisis in late 2018 (blue) when President Maithripala Sirisena sacked Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe and replaced him with Mahinda Rajapaksa. Later, when his decision was contested, he dissolved Parliament and called for a snap general election

* All the indices are on a scale of 0 to 1. Zero is the lowest score possible and one is highest

^ Compliance with the judiciary is measured on a scale of 0 to 4 0: Never 1: Seldom 2: About half the time 3: Usually 4: Always

@ Executive bribery is measured on a scale of 0 to 4 0: It is routine and expected 4: It never, or hardly ever, happens

# Ideology index is measured on a scale of 0 to 4 0: Not at all 1: To a small extent 2: To some extent but it is not the most important component 3: To a large extent but not exclusively 4: Almost exclusively

Source: V-Dem Institute, World Bank

Also read: In Sri Lankan crisis, a window of economic opportunity

0 / 0
Sign in to unlock member-only benefits!
  • Access 10 free stories every month
  • Save stories to read later
  • Access to comment on every story
  • Sign-up/manage your newsletter subscriptions with a single click
  • Get notified by email for early access to discounts & offers on our products
Sign in

Comments

Comments have to be in English, and in full sentences. They cannot be abusive or personal. Please abide by our community guidelines for posting your comments.

We have migrated to a new commenting platform. If you are already a registered user of The Hindu and logged in, you may continue to engage with our articles. If you do not have an account please register and login to post comments. Users can access their older comments by logging into their accounts on Vuukle.