The Dalai Lama 'apostle of peace'; there's need to contribute more for Tibetan people: Kiren Rijiju

Union Minister Kiren Rijiju also said the government of India may review the Tibetan refugee policy from time to time for the ease of living of the community which was displaced from Tibet.

February 23, 2023 03:59 pm | Updated 03:59 pm IST - New Delhi

Union Law Minister Kiren Rijiju. File

Union Law Minister Kiren Rijiju. File | Photo Credit: PTI

Describing the Dalai Lama as "apostle of peace", Union Minister Kiren Rijiju on February 23 said there is a need to contribute significantly for the cause of the Tibetan people.

Addressing an event organised on the occasion of the Tibetan Buddhist new year, he also said the government of India's welfare schemes should also be extended to the large Tibetan community living in various parts of the country.

"Tibetan people never creates problems in India deliberately. They are very peace loving people. And the Dalai Lama is apostle of peace. He is the most loved and respected person in the world," he said.

China had in the past described the Dalai Lama as a "wolf in monk's robes", "double dealer" and a "secessionist chief" who is "seeking separation" of the region from the Communist nation.

Praying for the long and healthy life of the Dalai Lama, Mr. Rijiju said the spiritual leader's views are widely respected and accepted across the globe. He said the government of India may review the Tibetan refugee policy from time to time for the ease of living of the community which was displaced from Tibet.

"We need to contribute substantially for the cause of Tibetan people," he said at the event held at Delhi's Tibetan settlement Majnu Ka Tila. "One day you will live at a place with dignity and have a respectable life," he said.

The Minister said the government of India's various welfare schemes for the people should also be extended to the large Tibetan community living in India on humanitarian grounds. He said Tibetan people were spread in various parts of India and they were very hardworking and successful.

"Many Tibetan people settled in various parts of the world and many of them have gone from India. Wherever they live they always carry the Tibetan legacy and never forget their roots. They always offer respect to the Dalai Lama," he said.

Mr. Rijiju said the Narendra Modi government had refined the Tibetan refugee policy and he was the first Union Minister to visit many of the Tibetan settlements in India. "Rules for the Tibetan people need to be re-looked from time to time for the ease of living. If needed it will be done in future," he said.

The Minister said the issue of entry points could be re-looked in consultation with the Ministries of Home and External Affairs. He also assured the Tibetan community of trying to resolve their various issues, including land, legal and business.

"India is governed by law, rules and regulations and you live peacefully and respectfully. People of India recognise that, people of India love you too," he said. Mr. Rijiju said Indian and Tibetan cultures have many similarities and India is not complete without Himalayan region.

He also referred to the Hindu revered site Kailash Mansarovar and other places located in Himalayan region. Addressing the function, RSS leader Indresh Kumar, who is also patron of Bharat Tibet Sahyog Manch, said the world wants peace but if someone's rights are taken away, there can't be any peace.

"If someone's rights are taken away, then it is not possible that there will be peace," he said, indicating to China.

"No one should take away anyone's right, it is not only for the Himalayas, not only for Asia but for everywhere. Peace is necessary for harmony," Mr. Kumar said. A Minister in the Tibetan government in exile Gyari Dolma also spoke on the occasion.

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