No plans to add new members to Quad grouping now: U.S. White House

Prime Ministers of India, Australia, Japan and the U.S. are scheduled to meet in Australia for the third in-person summit on May 24, amidst China's aggressive behaviour in the strategically important region

Updated - November 06, 2023 10:04 pm IST

Published - May 02, 2023 11:25 am IST - Washington

File photo of Australian Prime Minister Anthony Albanese, U.S. President Joe Biden and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida at the Quad leaders summit in Tokyo on May 22, 2022. The White House said the Quad is a young partnership and there are no plans to add new members at the time, ahead of the third-in-person summit in Sydney on May 24, 2023.

File photo of Australian Prime Minister Anthony Albanese, U.S. President Joe Biden and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida at the Quad leaders summit in Tokyo on May 22, 2022. The White House said the Quad is a young partnership and there are no plans to add new members at the time, ahead of the third-in-person summit in Sydney on May 24, 2023. | Photo Credit: Reuters

There is no plan to add new members to the Quad now, the White House has said, emphasising that the relatively young grouping welcomes opportunities to work with a wide range of Indo-Pacific partner countries on issues like maritime security, infrastructure and climate change.

The Quad or Quadrilateral Security Dialogue comprises India, the U.S., Japan and Australia.

Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison, Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga, Prime Minister Narendra Modi, and U.S. President Joe Biden – are scheduled to meet in Sydney, Australia for the third in-person summit on May 24, amidst China's aggressive behaviour in the strategically important region.

“The Quad was established two years ago. The Quad is still a relatively young partnership. There are no plans for new members at this time,” White House Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre told reporters on May 1 at her daily news conference.

Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, U.S. President Joe Biden and Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison at the White House on September 24, 2021, in Washington.

Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, U.S. President Joe Biden and Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison at the White House on September 24, 2021, in Washington. | Photo Credit: AP

Quad members, she said, have agreed that for now, they'll focus on cementing the Quad's many strengths.

“However, the Quad welcomes opportunities to work with a wide range of Indo-Pacific partners, such as through its Indo-Pacific partners on maritime domain awareness, which is delivering cutting edge maritime domain awareness technology around the region,” she said in response to a question.

“The May 24th Sydney Summit will showcase other opportunities for the Quad to partner around the region on climate, global health, infrastructure, and more. The Quad's top priority is ensuring it is well-positioned to deliver for the Indo-Pacific. And so, there's no conversation on extending or expanding at this time,” Jean-Pierre said.

ALSO READ | Explained | What’s the 4-nation Quad, where did it come from?

In May last year, the Quad leaders met in Tokyo for the 2nd in-person summit.

During that summit, President Biden launched the ambitious Indo-Pacific Economic Framework for Prosperity (IPEF), which is an initiative aimed at deeper cooperation among like-minded countries in areas such as clean energy, supply-chain resilience and digital trade.

The rollout of the IPEF is expected to send a signal that the U.S. is focused on pushing forward a strong economic policy for the region to counter China's aggressive strategy on trade in the region.

In March 2021, President Biden hosted the first-ever summit of the Quad leaders in the virtual format that was followed by an in-person summit in Washington in September.

In November 2017, India, Japan, the U.S. and Australia gave shape to the long-pending proposal of setting up the Quad to develop a new strategy to keep the critical sea routes in the Indo-Pacific free of any influence, amidst China's growing military presence in the strategic region.

India, the U.S. and several other world powers have been talking about the need to ensure a free, open and thriving Indo-Pacific in the backdrop of China's rising military manoeuvring in the region.

China claims nearly all of the disputed South China Sea, though Taiwan, the Philippines, Brunei, Malaysia and Vietnam all claim parts of it. Beijing has built artificial islands and military installations in the South China Sea.

0 / 0
Sign in to unlock member-only benefits!
  • Access 10 free stories every month
  • Save stories to read later
  • Access to comment on every story
  • Sign-up/manage your newsletter subscriptions with a single click
  • Get notified by email for early access to discounts & offers on our products
Sign in

Comments

Comments have to be in English, and in full sentences. They cannot be abusive or personal. Please abide by our community guidelines for posting your comments.

We have migrated to a new commenting platform. If you are already a registered user of The Hindu and logged in, you may continue to engage with our articles. If you do not have an account please register and login to post comments. Users can access their older comments by logging into their accounts on Vuukle.