Andaman and Nicobar administration has ordered an inquiry into reports, which alleged that the Jarawa tribe women were being sexually exploited by poachers for alcohol and marijuana.

The Jarawas are one of the six endangered indigenous tribes of the Islands.

“I have directed for a detailed inquiry into the incident after obtaining the recording, which a local media seems to be having. If anyone is found guilty, police has been directed to take action against them,” Lt. Gen. (Retd) Ajay Kumar Singh, Lieutenant Governor of Andaman and Nicobar Islands told a team of visiting journalists.

He said the administration was conscious of the indigenous tribe present in the Islands and observed that the tribe which was around 230 to 250 before a decade has grown to around 400 now.

Detailing on the strict vigil being observed by police, Mr. Singh said “Every convoy of vehicles (on Andaman Trunk Road) are being escorted by two police vehicles. Strict rules are put in place like even if the Jarawas come towards the moving vehicles, the drivers should not stop.”

If they were any violations made by the vehicles, they stand to face imprisonment between three to seven years, he said.

The Great Andaman Trunk Road, which connects Port Blair with the northern part of the Island passes through the dense forest that houses the Jarawas. The 400 plus Jarawas is estimated to have been living in an area spreading over 1,000 sq km. Offences by tourists are believed to be happening on this road.

Though the Supreme Court had ordered the closure of the road, it revoked the order following the request of Andaman and Nicobar administration, which cited the thousands of mainstream population, which is living in the northern part of the Island and needed to travel to the Union territory capital of Port Blair often.

Mr, Singh said the administration have been very strict on poachers into the area and recalled a recent incident in which a village Pradhan was also arrested.