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Updated: May 8, 2010 02:31 IST

Government colleges perform with flying colours

R. Krishna Kumar
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Many Government colleges in the district have produced impressive results in the Pre-University examinations contrary to popular perception that these colleges fare badly owing to poor teaching faculty and the socio-economic background of the candidates.

What is more, the success stories of the students — many of who are first-generation learners — is heart-warming and underlines their determination to overcome their social and economic handicap and pursue their areas of interest.

A case in point is the performance of M.B. Lavanya who comes from Arkalgud in Hassan district and is a student of Maharani Arts and Science College. She not only scored 556 out of 600 but secured 100 out of 100 in Mathematics and Chemistry, 98 in Physics and 96 in Biology. A hard-working student, she aspires to be a doctor and drew inspiration from the college staff whom she said were dedicated. Lavanya's father is an agriculturist and she was put up in the hostel for her Pre- University course. “My future career choice will depend on the outcome of the CET but I have fared well and will opt for medical rather than engineering,” said Lavanya.

Focussed study

Had it not been for her weakness in languages, she could have easily topped the merit list in the State, according to K. Chandramma, Deputy Director of Pre-University Education. But that has not discouraged Lavanya, who is focussed on her future career plan and is keenly awaiting the CET results. Lavanya's is not a one-off case. Another student, Nishanth, of Maharaja's Government PU College scored 562 out of 600 in the Science stream.

Just as good

The performance of students from Government colleges was as good as those studying in reputed private institutions who are backed by tuitions, intensive coaching and an ambience to keep them focused on academics. These advantages are not open to many students of the Government colleges.

If the private institutions fared exceptionally well, the performance of Government colleges too are just as good. For instance, the Maharanis Arts and Science College, the pass percentage was 66 and out of 724 students who sat for the examination, 477 cleared it. There were 11 distinctions, 190 first classes and 140 second classes.

Similarly, in the Devaraja PU College, 201 students appeared for the exam of which 121 passed; there were 46 first classes.

In the Government PU College in Kuvempunagar, 76 students passed in the first class and 64 in the second class.

In the Maharaja PU College, the pass percentage was 79, and out of 658 students who appeared, 18 passed with distinction and 252 passed with first classes and 148 students cleared the examination with a second class.

Assumptions belied

Expressing happiness over the performance of Government college students, educationists like Jainahalli Satyanarayana Gowda said it was satisfying when students from different socio-economic backgrounds, without parental guidance and encouragement as back up, secured good grades. It also belies the common misconception that teaching in Government institutions is below par.

Policy observed

This was a view endorsed by Rajeshwari, Principal, JSS College of Women, at Saraswatihpuram.

The college, run by the JSS Mahavidyapeetha, has a policy not to reject any student who applies for admission. “Hence we have students who secure 35 to 40 per cent in the SSLC examination but we do not deny them admission.

Yet, the college has secured 88 per cent results and it is satisfying to note that the students over the years, lift their performance and learning skills and are on a par with other college toppers,” she added.

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