Women at the peak of their monthly menstrual cycle may be more vulnerable to psychological side-effects resulting from stress, finds a new study team that includes an Indian-origin researcher. The research is the first to show a potential link between psychological vulnerability and the timing of ovulation. A common symptom of mood and anxiety problems is the tendency to experience repetitive and unwanted thoughts. These ‘intrusive thoughts’ often occur in the days and weeks after a stressful experience.

The findings could have important implications for mental health problems and their treatment in women who have suffered trauma. It can help doctors identify potentially vulnerable women for preventive therapy.

— ANI

Paris looks set for Ms Mayor

A woman is likely to be mayor of Paris for the first time in the city’s 2,000-year history. The outcome of the conservative primary that begins May 31 is all but decided, and Nathalie Kosciusko-Morizet, or NKM as she is called, is widely considered the only candidate with a realistic chance.

Kosciusko-Morizet, 40, is an engineer with deep family roots in France’s political world. Her grandfather was once ambassador to the US and her father is mayor of a small town on the outskirts of the capital. She herself was mayor of the Paris suburb of Longjumeau until this year.

Kosciusko-Morizet also led the Ministry of Ecology, Sustainable Development, Transport and Housing under former President Nicolas Sarkozy, where she was seen as a tech-savvy and ambitious star.

— AP

Apple’s leading earner is a woman

Cathy Kearney is the Silicon Valley computer giant Apple’s top lieutenant in Ireland, and is responsible for selling iPads, iPhones and MacBooks to scores of markets across Europe, the Middle East and Africa. No less than $22bn of Apple’s profits — two-thirds of the total for the group — came from Kearney’s Cork companies in 2011 alone.

Two years ago, Kearney featured in a list of Ireland’s 20 most powerful women produced by Irish Independent. It declared that Apple’s success owed much to her “shrewd direction”, though it also noted that she was a very private individual and had refused to provide biographical details or a photograph.

An accountant in the Irish city of Cork, the 49-year-old lives with her husband and children in a large, but far from grand, farmhouse. Outside work, she is involved in the local church. Back in the US, Tim Cook, Apple’s chief executive, has described this international success as unprecedented.

Husbands can’t escape maintenance: Court

A man cannot escape from paying maintenance to his wife by lying about his income and trying to portray himself as being poor, the Bombay High Court observed while upholding the Rs. 1.5 lakh maintenance awarded to a woman and daughter by the family court.

Justice Roshan Dalvi was hearing an appeal filed by a man challenging the family court order directing him to pay the maintenance amount. In 2008, the family court had initially directed the man to pay maintenance of Rs. 7,000 to the wife and Rs. 3,000 to the daughter. In January 2011, the wife filed a review with evidence to show that her husband was managing director of several diamond trading firms in Dubai. In July 2012, the family court increased the maintenance, following which the man approached the High Court.

Upholding the awarded amount , Justice Dalvi observed that when the husband does not come clean about his income or makes unbelievable claims of not possessing anything, the court should consider all evidence that betray such claims. The husband told the High Court that he was working as an employee with a firm in Dubai and earning Rs 15,000 a month. The wife, however, produced a printout sent by her husband to his father, which showed how the husband wanted his father to fabricate evidence to show his income to be Rs.15,000,” the High Court noted.

After going through several documents and photographs submitted by the wife, Justice Dalvi said that the evidence clearly showed the husband carrying on diamond trading business with in various companies in Dubai.

— PTI

Breastfeeding good for moms too

Breastfeeding is not only good for the baby, it also has health benefits for moms! Researchers from the University of Western Sydney School of Medicine found the longer a woman breastfed, the lower her odds of developing high blood pressure before the age of 64. This is said to be the first study to show the link between breastfeeding and high blood pressure among Australian women. The reasons for this are still unknown, but it is possible that hormones released while breastfeeding provide long-term benefits to the mother’s cardiovascular system. The study was published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

— PTI