FIDE World Cup finals | Carlsen claims the crown; Praggnanandhaa wins hearts

The Norwegian, after winning the first rapid game when the Indian’s erred under time-pressure on the 42nd turn, accomplishes the mission by settling for a draw in the second

August 24, 2023 05:10 pm | Updated 10:17 pm IST - Baku

R. Praggnanandhaa (right) competes against Norway’s Magnus Carlsen during the final at the FIDE Chess World Cup in Baku on August 24, 2023.

R. Praggnanandhaa (right) competes against Norway’s Magnus Carlsen during the final at the FIDE Chess World Cup in Baku on August 24, 2023. | Photo Credit: AFP

Magnus Carlsen came good when it mattered and stopped R. Praggnanandhaa 2.5-1.5 for his maiden World Cup title in Baku, in Azerbaijan, on Thursday.

After the two classical games ended in draws, Carlsen won the first rapid game when Praggnanandhaa’s sense of danger let him down and he erred under time-pressure on the 42nd turn. In the next five moves, Praggnanandhaa faced a loss of bishop and resigned in 47 moves.

 

Facing a must-win situation in the second game with black pieces, Praggnanandhaa could not get the position from where he could put pressure on Carlsen. Soon it became clear that Praggnanandhaa, at best, could get a draw which he eventually did in just 22 moves.

Praggnanandhaa said, “I could have done better in the tie-breaker. These are shorter time-control and Magnus is very good at it. After the first game, I could have given a better fight, But being in a must-win situation with black pieces against Magnus was difficult. But I am happy to qualify for the Candidates, that’s very important.”

 

Carlsen said, “That I am not feeling good physically is well documented. I was happy to get the match to tie-breaker to get an extra day’s rest. But I was feeling pretty much spent. What prevailed today was experience. There were two key moments in the game today. He caught me out in the opening. Frankly, I did not know this line he played at all. I was trying to respond by common sense moves. Today, I also felt that Praggnanandhaa played impulsively, something that he usually does not. And once he got into a time-scramble, I exploited the weak squares and it was easy. Pragg played really well in general in the tournament. He had an exceptional performance. Today, he had two moments of inexperience that cost him.”

 

Carlsen chose to rate his first classical game against D. Gukesh as the best game of his tournament. “Gukesh is extremely strong and he was sort of unlucky to have faced me that one day when I really showed my best.”

The result saw Carlsen win $110,000 and Praggnanandhaa earn $80,000 (approx. ₹66,10,724). Later, Fabiano Caruana finished third after beating Nijat Abasov 3-1 by claiming the first two rapid games.

Indian Grandmaster R Praggnanandhaa during the final match of the Chess World Cup 2023 final against Norwegian Grandmaster Magnus Carlsen, in Baku, on August 24, 2023.

Indian Grandmaster R Praggnanandhaa during the final match of the Chess World Cup 2023 final against Norwegian Grandmaster Magnus Carlsen, in Baku, on August 24, 2023. | Photo Credit: PTI

Carlsen may have proved his class, but this World Cup will be remembered for Praggnanandhaa leading India’s charge in the premier competition. For the first time, four Indians made it to the quarterfinals, with the fourth Indian Vidit Gujrathi accounting for the last Russian Ian Nepomniachtchi, seeded four.

 

Praggnanandhaa took out World No 2 Hikaru Nakamura and World No. 3 Caruana as he played way over his ranking.

The results:

Open (final): Magnus Carlsen (Nor) bt R. Praggnanandhaa 2.5-1.5; For third place: Fabiano Caruana (USA) bt Nijat Asabov (Aze) 3-1.

Praggnanandhaa’s historic road to final

Grandmaster R Praggnanandhaa wrote a golden chapter in Indian chess history by becoming only the second player from the country after Viswanathan Anand — and the youngest — to play in the FIDE World Cup final.

The 18-year-old Indian lost the summit clash to Norway’s world No.1 Magnus Carlsen here on Thursday.

PTI takes a look at his journey in the elite event: R Praggnanandhaa’s road to World Cup final:

*Got a bye in first round.

*Defeated French Grandmaster Maxime Lagarde 1.5-0.5 in second round.

*Beat experienced Czech GM David Navara 1.5-0.5 in third round.

*Beat world No. 2 Hikaru Nakamura of USA 3-1 in fourth round.

*Beat Hungarian Ferenc Berkes 1.5-0.5 in fifth round.

*Registered a come-from-behind 5-4 win over compatriot Arjun Erigaisi in the sixth round.

*Beat Italian-American Grandmaster, Fabiano Caruana, ranked third in the world, 3.5-2.5 in the semifinal to become the youngest to reach the summit clash of the World Cup.

*Game 1 of Final on Tuesday ended in a draw after 35 moves.

*Game 2 between Praggnanandhaa and Carlsen also ended in a quick draw in just 30 moves.

*Praggnanandhaa and Carlsen returned on August 24 to play in the shorter time control games, with the Indian losing in the tie-break.

(With PTI inputs)

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