Serious injury episodes

November 25, 2014 11:57 pm | Updated November 27, 2021 06:55 pm IST

The Hindu looks at some serious incidents of player injuries after being hit on the head on the cricket field.

Bert Oldfield: During the infamous Bodyline series in 1932-33, the Australian wicketkeeper suffered a skull fracture by a delivery from English pacer Harold Larwood.

Nari Contractor: The former India captain’s career ended abruptly when he was struck by a bouncer from pacer Charlie Griffith during a tour game against Barbados in 1962. Contractor suffered a skull-fracture and underwent two surgeries. He returned to first-class cricket, but never played a Test again.

Ewen Chatfield: The former New Zealand bowler was struck on his temple by a bouncer from English fast bowler Peter Lever in 1975. Chatfield swallowed his tongue and became unconscious. Only timely intervention by England’s physiotherapist Bernard Thomas saved the New Zealander’s life.

Raman Lamba: The former Indian player was stuck on his temple while fielding at short-leg during a club game in Bangladesh in 1998. Lamba wasn’t wearing a helmet. He suffered internal haemorrhage and slipped into coma, and died a few days later.

Incidents in 2014This year has seen a few incidents where batsmen got injured fending off bouncers.

In February, South Africa’s Ryan McLaren was hit by a Mitchell Johnson bouncer during the first Test against Australia at Centurion. While he continued batting, he was later diagnosed with a concussion.

During India’s tour of England, Stuart Broad top-edged a Varun Aaron delivery that got through his helmet grille and sustained a nose injury.

Earlier this month, Pakistan’s Ahmad Shehzad suffered a skull fracture when a Corey Anderson delivery hit him on head during the first Test against New Zealand at Abu Dhabi.

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