Letters to the Editor — March 15, 2023
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March 15, 2023 12:24 am | Updated 12:24 am IST

Parliament disrupted

The aggressive attitude taken by the BJP in Parliament demanding an apology from Rahul Gandhi for allegedly ‘defaming the country in a foreign land’ seems fishy. It has been the contention of the ruling party that the Prime Minister and the government he leads have been instrumental in India gaining its due respect and recognition on the world stage. If that is true, is the reputation and recognition created by nine years of ‘tireless hard work’ by the top leader and his entire machinery so weak that it can be defamed by the mere talk of a single individual over a few days? It appears that the government seems to be happy to have Parliament being disrupted and Bills being pushed through without any worthwhile discussion on legislative matters or issues of public importance. The ruling party should be made accountable on the floor of the House.

M.D. Ravikanth,

Chennai

Introspecting on the win

Is it just a coincidence that Bomman, one of the protagonists of the Oscar-winning The Elephant Whisperers, has the story replaying as far as he is concerned? That he has been tasked with looking after two more orphaned baby elephants of a herd where the adults were electrocuted in Dharmapuri, Tamil Nadu, recently? (Inside pages, March 14). This development only highlights the dangers young elephants are facing now with adult elephants falling to illegal electrical fencing accidents, forest fires and even encroachments. While being one with the forests — like Bellie and Bomman from the documentary — cannot be a way of life for most of us, the least we could do is be a little more mindful of our consumption. Our increasing demands invariably encroach upon the lives of wild animals and threaten their very existence.

Sara A. Haris,

Kochi, Kerala

The write-up on the ‘unglamorous life’ of Bomman and Bellie was a touching one. The couple, as elephant saviours, has brought fame to India. They may even become the unsung ambassadors of tourism in India. Far from the glitzy Oscar awards, they continue to lead a quiet and simple rustic life, taking care of baby elephants as if they are their own. It is for the government to recognise their immense contribution to conservation and reward them well as they have played a significant but quiet part in letting the world know the story of abandoned or lost calves.

C.G. Kuriakose,

Kothamangalam, Kerala

I disagree with the reader/letter writer from Lalgudi, Tamil Nadu (Letters to the Editor, March 14). The reader has appreciated the Oscar award to The Elephant Whisperers, but is upset about the award for RRR’s ‘Naatu Naatu’. Yes, The Elephant Whisperers has beautifully portrayed the connection between man and animal, but ‘Naatu Naatu’ is complete entertainment that is being enjoyed by me and my friends sitting in Haryana as well as people all across the country. So, let us enjoy the moment.

Kshitiz Bhardwaj,

Maheshwari, Rewari, Haryana

To dismiss the Oscar for the ‘Nattu Nattu’ song as a visual delight without substance amounts to discrediting one of the best produced choreography tracks ever. It acts as a stress reliever for many. The song has to do more with the choreography than the music. It is a perfectly produced dance sequence without dramatisation. This is not in anyway to take away credit for The Elephant Whisperers, which is a different genre. It is a moment of pride that two Indian entries have won the coveted Oscar awards.

A.V. Narayanan, Tiruchi, Tamil Nadu Business group and probe

Not a day passes without some report or other about the alleged opaque transactions of the Adani Group. We have been told SEBI is in the process of initiating a probe and that volatility in stocks has not affected the financial system. But baffling and bewildering is the level of debt exposure to the Life Insurance Corporation of India. One hopes there are answers and the caravan does not move on quietly.

Mani Nataraajan,

Chennai

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