Protests against UCC build up in three northeastern States

NGOs in the northeast follow political parties in opposing the implementation of Uniform Civil Code

July 02, 2023 04:20 pm | Updated 09:31 pm IST - GUWAHATI

“The UCC will affect local customs, laws and even the Sixth Schedule of the Constitution,” said Robertjune Kharjahrin (in picture), the president of the Hynniewtrep Youth Council representing the matrilineal Khasi community. Photo: hycorg.in

“The UCC will affect local customs, laws and even the Sixth Schedule of the Constitution,” said Robertjune Kharjahrin (in picture), the president of the Hynniewtrep Youth Council representing the matrilineal Khasi community. Photo: hycorg.in

GUWAHATI

A new organisation in Nagaland has threatened to burn down the official quarters of all the 60 legislators if the State Assembly succumbs to the Centre’s pressure and passes a Bill in support of the Uniform Civil Code (UCC).

The Nagaland Transparency, Public Rights Advocacy and Direct-Action Organisation said enforcing the UCC would be a violation of the special constitutional rights given to the State and disrupt the unique customs and traditions of the Naga people.

The organisation said in a statement that its members would not hesitate to go to the extent of setting ablaze the official quarters of Nagaland’s MLAs if UCC gets the nod.

Recalling the BJP-led government’s attempt in 2022 to impose Hindi as the national language, Christian majority Nagaland’s Rising People’s Party opposed the move to implement the UCC because of the overarching ideology of homogeneity behind it. The party also said the UCC was in keeping with the push for “one nation, one religion, one language” by the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh.

In Meghalaya, the Hynniewtrep Youth Council representing the matrilineal Khasi community said it would write to the Law Commission of India against the move to impose the UCC.

Also read: Differences over UCC | Oppn. parties are not ‘photocopies’ of each other: Derek O’ Brien

“The UCC will affect local customs, laws and even the Sixth Schedule of the Constitution,” the council’s president, Robertjune Kharjahrin said.

“The Constitution is for the people of India and not to please some political powers. If they have to implement UCC, it has to be first explained to every citizen of the country. People have to see what their representatives are implementing,” Agnes Kharshiing, the president of Civil Society Women’s Organisation told journalists in Shillong.

The opposition to the UCC has been the strongest in Meghalaya, Mizoram, and Nagaland where Christians account for 74.59%, 86.97%, and 87.93% respectively according to the 2011 Census. The other northeastern States have preferred to go through the draft before reacting.

The northeast is one of the most culturally diverse regions in the world and is home to more than 220 ethnic communities. Many fear that the UCC would affect their customary laws protected by the Constitution.

Top News Today

Sign in to unlock member-only benefits!
  • Access 10 free stories every month
  • Save stories to read later
  • Access to comment on every story
  • Sign-up/manage your newsletter subscriptions with a single click
  • Get notified by email for early access to discounts & offers on our products
Sign in

Comments

Comments have to be in English, and in full sentences. They cannot be abusive or personal. Please abide by our community guidelines for posting your comments.

We have migrated to a new commenting platform. If you are already a registered user of The Hindu and logged in, you may continue to engage with our articles. If you do not have an account please register and login to post comments. Users can access their older comments by logging into their accounts on Vuukle.