Andhra Pradesh

‘Indian thought is very hospitable for human rights’

Prof. S.S. Rama Rao Pappu, delivering a lecture during the inaugural session of of 89th Indian Philosophical Congress on Monday in Rajahmundry on Nannaya University campus. Photo: S. Rambabu

Prof. S.S. Rama Rao Pappu, delivering a lecture during the inaugural session of of 89th Indian Philosophical Congress on Monday in Rajahmundry on Nannaya University campus. Photo: S. Rambabu

The 89th edition of the Indian Philosophical Congress (IPC) was inaugurated here on Monday at the newly-constructed Adikavi Nannaya University campus, Velugubanda village on the outskirts of Rajahmundry.

About 150 philosophers, scholars, teachers and students from across the country are participating in the conference to exchange views on history of philosophy, logic and scientific method, metaphysics and epistemology, ethics and social philosophy besides religion. The conference will conclude on January 8.

Professor S.S. Ramarao Pappu from Miami University, USA, was the chief guest at the congress that was inaugurated by Bhuvan Chandel from Centre for Studies in Civilisation, New Delhi. Nannaya University Vice-Chancellor Prof. George Victor presided over the inaugural ceremony. Prof G.P. Das from Utkal University delivered the presidential address and Registrar of Nannaya University E.N. Dhanamjaya Rao coordinated.

Prof. S.S. Ramarao Pappu said there was no human rights tradition in India, but Indian thought was historically very hospitable for human rights. Stating that all human rights revolved around three fundamental areas — dignity, freedom and equality — he explained that there were integral part of Indian tradition and therefore, there was no opposition for the inclusion of human rights doctrines in the Indian constitution. Prof. Bhuvana Chandel focussed on knowledge, wisdom and values in the Indian tradition. The Indian tradition could be seen as based on an integral conception of values-theory of the ‘purusharthas’ and the classical texts of Indian philosophy provide ample evidence of the fact that the Indian classical mind was deeply concerned with the nature of human existence.

Vice-Chancellor, Patna University, Y.C. Simhadri delivered K. Sachidananda Murty Memorial lecture. In this connection, he said that K. Sachidananda Murthy’s vision was ‘philosophy of inclusiveness’ and method was dialectical in approach, in which Murthy appeared to be primarily a social philosopher. As a whole, he said “Murty’s contribution to philosophy is exploring the neglected philosophies, asserting the comparative method, making philosophy a tool for clarification of the misconception we entertain, and assert the role of philosophy teachers in transforming the society”.


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Printable version | Aug 9, 2022 4:42:15 am | https://www.thehindu.com/news/national/andhra-pradesh/indian-thought-is-very-hospitable-for-human-rights/article6757356.ece