Taliban say committed to Afghan peace talks, want ‘Islamic system’

Its co-founder assures that the rights of women, minorities would be protected

Updated - June 20, 2021 09:47 pm IST

Published - June 20, 2021 09:08 pm IST - Kabul

Intense fighting: A “Sangorians” militiaman firing at the Taliban insurgents in Mukhtar, in this file photo.

Intense fighting: A “Sangorians” militiaman firing at the Taliban insurgents in Mukhtar, in this file photo.

The Taliban said on Sunday they were committed to peace talks, adding they wanted a “genuine Islamic system” in Afghanistan that would make provisions for women’s rights in line with cultural traditions and religious rules.

The statement came amid slow progress in the talks between the Islamic group and Afghan government representatives in Qatar and as violence rises dramatically around the country ahead of the withdrawal of foreign forces by September 11.

Officials have said the Taliban has not yet submitted a written peace proposal that could be used as a starting point for substantive talks.

“We understand that the world and Afghans have queries and questions about the form of the system to be established following withdrawal of foreign troops,” said Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar, the Taliban co-founder and the head of their political office, in the statement.

“A genuine Islamic system is the best means for solution of all issues of the Afghans,” he said. “Our very participation in the negotiations and support on our part indicates that we believe in resolving issues through understanding.”

He added that women and minorities would be protected and diplomats and NGO workers would be able to work securely. “We take it on ourselves as a commitment to accommodate all rights of citizens of our country, whether they are male or female, in the light of the rules of the glorious religion of Islam and the noble traditions of the Afghan society,” he said, adding that ‘facilities would be provided’ for women to work and be educated. It was not clear whether the Taliban would allow women to carry out public roles and whether workplaces and schools would be segregated by gender.

In May, U.S. intelligence analysts released an assessment that the Taliban “would roll back much” of the progress made in Afghan women’s rights if the Islamist extremists regained national power.

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