Russians strike Ukraine as Kremlin-staged votes continue

The Russian forces struck areas in Ukraine, damaging residential buildings and civilian infrastructure

September 24, 2022 02:15 pm | Updated 06:37 pm IST - KYIV, Ukraine

A general view of a damaged building following missile strike, amid Russia’s attack on Ukraine, in Zaporizhzhia, Ukraine in this handout picture released on September 24, 2022.

A general view of a damaged building following missile strike, amid Russia’s attack on Ukraine, in Zaporizhzhia, Ukraine in this handout picture released on September 24, 2022. | Photo Credit: Reuters

Russian forces launched new strikes on Ukrainian cities on September 24 as Kremlin-orchestrated votes continued in occupied regions of Ukraine to pave the way for their annexation by Moscow.

Zaporizhzhia Gov. Oleksandr Starukh said the Russians targeted infrastructure facilities in the Dnieper River city, and one of the missiles hit an apartment building, killing one person and injuring seven others.

The Russian forces also struck other areas in Ukraine, damaging residential buildings and civilian infrastructure.

The British Defense Ministry said that Russia was targeting the Pechenihy dam on the Siverskyy Donets River in northeastern Ukraine following previous strikes on a dam on a reservoir near Kryvyi Rih, causing flooding on the Inhulets River.

“Ukrainian forces are advancing further downstream along both rivers,” the British said. “As Russian commanders become increasingly concerned about their operational setbacks, they are probably attempting to strike the sluice gates of dams, in order to flood Ukrainian military crossing points.”

Amid the fighting, voting continued in Kremlin-organized referendums in occupied areas — votes that Ukraine and its Western allies dismissed as a sham with no legal force.

In the five-day voting in the eastern Luhansk and Donetsk regions and Kherson and Zaporizhzhia in the south that began Friday, election officials accompanied by police officers carried ballots to homes and set up mobile polling stations, citing safety reasons. The votes are set to wrap up Tuesday when balloting will be held at polling stations.

The voting was also was held in Russia, where refugees and other residents of those regions cast ballots.

Russian President Vladimir Putin has said that Moscow will heed the residents' will, a clear indication that the Kremlin is poised to quickly annex the regions once the voting is over.

Ukraine and the West said the vote was an illegitimate attempt by Moscow to slice away a large part of the country, stretching from the Russian border to the Crimean Peninsula. A similar referendum took place in Crimea in 2014 before Moscow annexed it, a move that most of the world considered illegal.

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky urged Ukrainians in occupied regions to undermine the referendums and to share information about the people conducting “this farce.” He also urged Ukrainians to avoid being called up in the Russian mobilization announced Wednesday.

“But if you do end up in the Russian army, then sabotage any enemy activity, interfere with any Russian operations, give us all important information about the occupiers... And at the first opportunity, switch to our positions,” he said in his nightly address.

Russia's Defense Ministry said that a partial mobilization ordered by Mr. Putin aimed to add about 3,00,000 troops, but the presidential decree keeps the door open for a broader call-up.

Across Russa's 11 time zones, men hugged their weeping family members before being rounded up for service amid fears that a wider call-up might follow. Some media reports claimed that the Russian authorities actually plan to mobilize more than 1 million, the allegations denied by the Kremlin.

Protests against the mobilization that erupted Wednesday in Moscow, St. Petersburg, and several other Russian cities were quickly dispersed by police, who arrested over 1,300 and immediately handed call-up summons to many of them. Anti-war activists are planning more protests Saturday.

Many Russian men tried desperately to leave the country, buying up scarce and exorbitantly priced plane tickets. Thousands of others fled by car, creating lines of traffic hours or even days long at some borders. The lines of cars were so long at the border with Kazakhstan that some people abandoned their vehicles and walked — just as some Ukrainians did after Russia invaded their country February 24.

In a bid to calm public fears over the call-up, the authorities announced that many of those working in high tech, communications or finance will be exempt.

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