They triumph as a team

Inmates of various ‘special’ schools stretch beyond their limits in tackling the post-Hudhud crisis. Its founder T. Saraswathi Devi said that nobody, except the mentally-challenged children of the school, had come forward to clear the uprooted trees and debris.

Updated - November 17, 2021 11:04 am IST

Published - October 31, 2014 11:37 pm IST - VISAKHAPATNAM:

Inmates of Lebenshilfe Special School lending a helping hand to clear debris on the school campus in Visakhapatnam on Friday. Photo: A. Manikanta Kumar

Inmates of Lebenshilfe Special School lending a helping hand to clear debris on the school campus in Visakhapatnam on Friday. Photo: A. Manikanta Kumar

It has taken a couple of weeks for the staff and students of the Government Residential School for Visually-Challenged Girls near Sagar Nagar to recoup from the devastation caused by the cyclonic storm Hudhud.

The school management gives full credit to the students, who have proved that physical disability is no obstacle in bringing the institution back to normal.

“While the staff members cleared the debris, the students helped in drying the beds and rearranging them in the dormitory. The district administration helped in setting up a 1 KV solar power unit through the New and Renewable Energy Development Corporation of Andhra Pradesh on our premises four days after the cyclone hit the coast,” says principal S. Nimton Babu.

The Uttarandhra Journalist Front and the Varahi Productions have promised to take up the responsibility of renovating the school.

The indomitable spirit of the trainees — hearing-impaired and specially-abled — at the Prajwal Vani Welfare Society was in full display when they worked as a team to restore the centre’s activities. A couple of computer systems were damaged as a huge stone fell on them under the impact of the strong gales that blew off the roofing. However, despite the odds, the training session could be restored within a few days. This would not have been possible without the teamwork of the trainees, who walked the extra mile to bring things back on track, said society’s founder and president K.V.L. Suchitra.

It was a similar experience for those studying in Lebenshilfe Special School.

Its founder T. Saraswathi Devi said that nobody, except the mentally-challenged children of the school, had come forward to clear the uprooted trees and debris. The campus was in a shambles with a dozen uprooted trees, collapsed walls, and broken sheds and windows. Despite their disability, our students were instrumental in the clean-up process, bringing the school back to normal, she said.

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