The significance behind Christmas ornaments

We all know about the decorated Christmas Tree but did you know that the various ornaments hung on it also have a meaning?

December 22, 2022 10:01 am | Updated 10:01 am IST

The evergreen fir is a symbol of everlasting life.

The evergreen fir is a symbol of everlasting life. | Photo Credit: Getty Images/iStock Photo

Christmas Tree: Traditionally, the Christmas tree is the evergreen fir. Not only was it believed to keep evil spirits and illnesses at bay, it was also a symbol of everlasting life with God.

An angel to represent heavenly visitors.

An angel to represent heavenly visitors. | Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Angels: Not only did angels visit Joseph and Mary but also appeared in the sky over Bethlehem to announce his birth. Since angels appeared high up in the sky, they are placed on top of the Christmas tree.

Star: Used instead of an angel on the tree top, the star represents the Christmas star that appeared on the night sky over Bethlehem to guide people to baby Jesus.

Announcing the birth of Christ

Announcing the birth of Christ | Photo Credit: Flickr

Bells: Traditionally it is believed that the ringing of bells drives out the evil spirits. On the Christmas tree, the bells symbolise the announcement of Jesus’ birth, as the heavenly host praised God.

Symbolic of the Good Shepherd

Symbolic of the Good Shepherd | Photo Credit: Flickr

Candy Cane: This red-and-white sweet is shaped like a shepherd’s crook to show that the humble shepherds were the first to worship Christ. Also, Jesus is often called the Good Shepherd. Another meaning is that the white represents Jesus’ purity and the red stands for his blood or sacrifice.

A symbol of the crown of thorns and the red of Jesus’ blood.

A symbol of the crown of thorns and the red of Jesus’ blood. | Photo Credit: Pixabay

Holly: The holly tree has sharp leaves and are said to signify the crown of thorns worn by Jesus. The red berries imply his blood.

Fruit basket: A representation of food, it is a sign of having plenty to eat and to remind us to be generous and share with others.

Represents fruitfulness and fertility

Represents fruitfulness and fertility | Photo Credit: Flickr

Pine cone: It represents fruitfulness, eternity, motherhood, and fertility.

True love

True love | Photo Credit: Max Pixel

Heart: It symbolises true love and love in the home.

A symbol for the Holy Spirit.

A symbol for the Holy Spirit. | Photo Credit: Needpix

Dove: This bird represents the Holy Spirit and symbolises joy and happiness. If the bird is in a nest, then it represents confidence in the cottage or home.

Bringing in good luck

Bringing in good luck | Photo Credit: Pixabay

Frog: A traditional symbol of good luck, the forward movement of frogs reminds us to move towards our goals.

Be hospitable.

Be hospitable. | Photo Credit: Flickr

Teapot: This ornament symbolises hospitality and reminds us to welcome our guests.

Guarantee of good luck

Guarantee of good luck | Photo Credit: Flickr

Pickle: A pickle ornament hidden in the tree is another tradition. It is believed that the person who finds it will have a year of good fortune.

A symbol of fertility and everlasting life

A symbol of fertility and everlasting life | Photo Credit: Pixabay

Mistletoe: This parasitic plant is one of the four plants that are symbols of Christmas. It grows on a variety of trees and continues to live even when those trees drop their leaves in autumn. Hence it became a symbol of fertility and everlasting life.

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