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Updated: August 30, 2010 16:46 IST

Doctor claims non-invasive treatment for spine problems

PTI
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A computer artwork of a healthy brain and upper spinal cord. The special technology device for the treatment using sound waves for an effective, non-invasive and painless treatment for spinal ailments including injuries, has been approved by the USFDA, Dr. Aslam Khan said.
Special Arrangement A computer artwork of a healthy brain and upper spinal cord. The special technology device for the treatment using sound waves for an effective, non-invasive and painless treatment for spinal ailments including injuries, has been approved by the USFDA, Dr. Aslam Khan said.

A leading Canada-based orthopaedic surgeon has claimed to have developed a technology using sound waves for an effective, non-invasive and painless treatment for spinal ailments including injuries.

“The treatment helps in gentle repositioning of vertebrae, functional restoration of the central nervous system and cellular bio-synthesis which is responsible for restoring and regenerating worn or damaged disks,” said Dr. Aslam Khan.

Called as the Khan Kinetic Treatment (KKT), the new technology, the Indian-origin doctor said, allows people with spine injuries due to accidents, sports injuries, sudden falls, repetitive activity-related injuries, postural abnormalities, stress, genetic pre-disposition to reduce or completely eliminate their pain.

Following this treatment, muscles, blood vessels and neural communication are stimulated and cellular bio-synthesis is triggered, initiating the body’s self-healing process, said 46-year-old Khan who claimed to have developed the KKT technology after 20 years of research.

The special technology device for the treatment has been approved by the USFDA, he said.

Research papers by Khan, Chairman and CEO of KKT International Centre for Spine which opened its first centre here recently, and his colleagues are published in peer reviewed journals such as American Journal of pain management (January 2007) and Journal of Musculoskeletal pain (November 2007).

Asked about the technique, Dr. Pradeep Bhosle, Head of Orthopaedic Department of King Edward Memorial (KEM) hospital said, “Yes, we keep hearing about these techniques expecting some magical thing to happen. Personally I do not have any experience“.

These developments have no role in medical text books or exams, he added.

“We are looking at stem cells to play a major role in joint pains,” Bhosle said.

In India, according experts, 50 per cent of the population suffers from backache at some point of time in their life with the incidence being as high as 70 per cent in the geriatric population.

Degenerative changes in the lower back constitute a normal feature of ageing and in young people, back pain is caused more often due to distortion of the gel like disc sandwiched between the vertebrae.

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