The indictment of Zakiur Rahman Lakhvi, operations commander of the Lashkar-e-Taiba, and six others for their suspected involvement in the Mumbai terror attack by a Pakistani court, no doubt, came at the right time -- a day before the anniversary of 26/11 attacks last year. Whether it will actually lead to the dismantling of the terror infrastructure in Pakistan is to be seen. But it will at least allow Pakistanis to introspect and come out of denial.

Pooja Sharma, Noida

It is but natural for us to remember 26/11 and recollect the agony the people of Mumbai suffered. India’s efforts soon after the attack succeeded in convincing the world that the perpetrators were Pakistani nationals. It is heartening to note that Islamabad has, at last, decided to bring the criminals to book. Of course, we have to wait and see whether it will prosecute the case to its logical conclusion.

D. Krishnamurthy, Visakhapatnam

The terror attack on Mumbai on the evening of November 26, 2008, is a tragedy that has imposed itself on the nation’s memory because of the daring of the attackers, the destruction and the killing spree they indulged in. As we reflect on how 26/11 has changed us, we are exposed to Pakistan’s single-point agenda of hostility against India. At every step, it has frustrated us and made a joke of our restraint. It is clear that its rulers have no intention of abandoning the use of terrorism as an instrument of state policy against India.

J.S. Acharya, Hyderabad

A year has passed since the horrendous attack on Mumbai and people are still waiting for justice. Innocent civilians and brave men in uniform died in the fight against terrorism. But we continue to wait for the terror infrastructure to be dismantled from the face of the earth. It is not possible unless we establish peace by eliminating the forces that espouse bloody ideologies and concepts.

Sumit Dhanraj, New Delhi

Much has been said about the Mumbai attack, television news channels have had panel discussions, newspapers published several articles and the country has mourned the loss of lives. But the hue and cry is of hardly any use to the families of victims who still await justice. The media should maintain the momentum to ensure that the issue is neither out of sight nor out of mind.

Megha Badoutiya, Visakhapatnam

Enough has been written and discussed in the media on 26/11 in the run-up to its anniversary. It may be necessary to discuss it in order to learn a lesson or two but is it necessary to rewind and recall the tragedy? The country has seen so many blasts since 1992. Whether it is Dawood Ibrahim, Afzal Guru or Ajmal ‘Kasab,’ we are far from bringing the perpetrators to justice. Why not close these cases so that we can move forward?

K.R. Anandagopalan, Bangalore

The Opposition has pointed out that only a few of the 26/11 victims have been compensated and requested the government to take necessary steps to compensate the rest. But the media have accused it saying it is politicising the attack. Is it wrong to advise the government to expedite matters? Is it enough to light candles at the venues of the attack and go away?

A number of people are dying everyday in Kashmir and naxal-hit areas, but the media do not mourn them in the way they mourn the Mumbai attack. Is it because of the targets of attack — high-profile five star hotels?

K. Prasanna Venkatesh, Vellore

This refers to the report that Sonia Gandhi salutes the indomitable spirit of Indians, Mumbaikars in particular (Nov. 26). We resume our lives with determination after every terrorist attack because we have no other go. In spite of losing their loved ones or becoming the casualty in terror attacks, the victims are helpless. It is the country’s top leadership which should ensure that Mumbai-type incidents do not recur. As long as we are soft on the issues related to safety and national security, and hesitate to punish the guilty in time, such incidents are bound to happen.

A.L. Narayana, Visakhapatnam

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