Robert Blake argued that India, in going on record against the Cuban resolution, associated itself with a group composed mainly of NATO allies and other close partners like Japan and Australia.

31383 4/25/2005 10:22 05 NEWDELHI 3080 Embassy New Delhi CONFIDENTIAL "This record is a partial extract of the original cable. The full text of the original cable is not available." "C O N F I D E N T I A L NEW DELHI 003080

SIPDIS

DRL FOR ACTING A/S KOZAK

E.O. 12958: DECL: 03/30/2015 TAGS: PREL, PHUM, CU, IN, Human Rights

SUBJECT: INDIA BREAKS RANKS TO OPPOSE GUANTANAMO RESOLUTION

Classified By: Charge Robert O. Blake, Jr., for Reasons 1.4 (B, D)

1. (U) Following up earlier approaches by the Charge, MEA Joint Secretary (Americas) S. Jaishankar called PolCouns on April 25 to make sure we had noticed the GOI's April 21 ""no"" vote on the Cuba-sponsored UNHRC resolution condemning US practices at Guantanamo. Jaishankar noted that most South Asian counties (Nepal, Bhutan, Pakistan and Sri Lanka) had abstained, while other major powers including China, South Africa, Malaysia and Mexico voted for the resolution (which failed 22-8-23). He argued that India, in going on record against the Cuban resolution, associated itself with a group composed mainly of NATO allies and other close partners like Japan and Australia.

2. (C) Comment: This was a positive gesture for the GOI, made easier by the fact that New Delhi could invoke its policy of generally opposing country-specific UNHRC resolutions. That policy results in incongruities such as democratic India abstaining on a UNHRC resolution to sanction North Korea and opposing resolutions against Cuba and Belarus. As with the DPRK, the path of least resistance in this instance would have been an abstention. India's willingness to vote against the Guantanamo resolution reflects New Delhi's firm line on GWOT issues and suggests we may be getting through with our reminders to the GOI that countries aspiring to UNSC permanent membership need to step up to the plate occasionally. It also provides a useful starting point for discussion at the May 17/18 Global Issues Forum regarding US-India efforts to better synchronize our approach to multilateral human rights issues and coordinate in global efforts at democracy promotion, as we have done recently in Nepal.

BLAKE