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Updated: December 18, 2012 18:42 IST

Thinking stitches

Harshini Vakkalanka
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Layered and embroidered Isha Kapoor with her latest collection. Photo: Sampath Kumar G.P.
Layered and embroidered Isha Kapoor with her latest collection. Photo: Sampath Kumar G.P.

Designer Isha Kapoor feels good casual wear, specially in cotton, is hard to find

Fashion transcends to art for designer Isha Kapoor, whose labels Aikeyah and Dozakh are on display at the Mogra store in Leela Galleria. Dozakh is a label that Isha shares with fellow designer Nitin Kartikeya while Aikeyah is her own creation.

“Our garments are wearable, at the same time, with the detailing and the kind of elements we incorporate, they become pieces of art to be admired before wearing. Only someone who knows what goes into its making would be comfortable wearing it,” says Isha, talking about the label Dozakh.

Dozakh is characterised by rich fabric, embroidery and craftsmanship. “We use French knots in our garments, which hardly any designers incorporate. Each of these garments has its own persona and identity,” explains Isha. “The embroidery is not all over the place. We usually keep the embroidery around a focal point around the neck keeping the rest of the outfit simple. We also work with a lot of ombres; we are fond of playing with colours.” Right now, the collection incorporates a lot of fuchsias, oranges and reds with some greys and browns.

Kartikeya and Isha opened their label over eight years ago with a store in Delhi’s Hauz Khas market. “We were in college when we started the label and we got a good customer response. We learnt directly from the market and the customer. I never interned or worked under any big names in the industry.” Isha and Kartikeya’s label has been a part of the India Fashion week for the past five years.

Dozakh, according to Isha, is an investment. “Dozakh is a luxury brand but those who invest in a Dozakh are going to wear it for the rest of their lives. The garments are classy, and so they won’t go out of fashion after a season.”

Aikeyah, on the other hand, is a new label, that Isha started working with only over six months ago. Consisting largely of tunics, Aikeyah is a line of casual wear in fabrics such as silk and cotton. “With Aikeyah, I do relaxed silhouettes that are simple and still look stylish when worn. I relate the look to a carefree, Bohemian street look.”

Aikeyah, in its present collection is all about kalamkari and block prints in solid, earthy colours that are best accessorised with chunky, oxidized silver jewellery. “This time I play with fabrics, I am fond of mixing and matching. If I do a tunic, I will have a jacket along with it, which can be used with something else. So the different pieces in the garment can be used as separates with other outfits,” she describes.

“These garments accentuate one’s personality. And it suits a city like Bangalore, which is carefree and relaxed.” With Aikeyah, Isha hopes to fill a gap that she finds in the market between upmarket brands and designer wear.

“People don’t really find good cotton clothes in most brands other than something like Fab India or Anokhi. Hardly anyone caters to such sensibilities. With Aikeyah I want to give Indian consumers garments that are essentially designer wear, but are comfortable. I target a niche clientele that has a keen eye and pays attention to details and silhouettes.”

Aikeyah and Dozakh are available until December 20 at the Mogra store, B-24, Leela Galleria, The Leela Palace, Old Airport Road. Call 41152457.

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