In the light of the controversy surrounding Vishwaroopam we asked youngsters on how they felt about rights to freedom and expression being curbed.

Movies made by Kamal have always delivered the reality to the crowd and met with some resistance. The movie’s depictions are not very far from the everyday realities of terrorism. These are voluntary, meaningless protests and I personally applaud his stance as an honest artiste. - SWETHA ANANTHAN, 19, Biotech student

Political motivations have blown the issue of this film’s release out of proportions. Movies sometimes depict some form of extremism, but it is up to a viewer’s discretion to have an impartial and sane viewpoint. I strongly believe that we artists are a people of separate religion and our foremost duty is to be honest with our creations. - GUNA SEKARAN, 25, Architect

I can’t deny that I find the ban on Vishwaroopam quite appalling. Snatching away one’s freedom of expression is not what this government should be doing. Lift the ban, let creativity shine. - SREEDEEP SREEKANTH, 20, IIT-M student

The delay is very disappointing as the movie is much anticipated. I think people should appreciate the effort put in by the artists and not mix religious sentiments with movies. - PRASHANT GANESH, 20

India is a secular country, and every citizen of India has the freedom of expression. I believe that the interests of an individual towards media must not limit the other from experiencing it. Everyone must discern for oneself alone and not for the rest of the community. I have not had a chance to watch the movie, but I am looking forward to this experience. - CANDIDA JANE MARIA USTINE, 25, Scientist

I don’t think this movie should have been released anywhere over the globe. Movies influence our lives a lot more than we think. The movie might create more differences among the people in the name of religion because Kamal Hassan’s movies and his words carry a lot of weight. - ALEEM RAHMAN, 26, Financial analyst

Delaying the release of a movie, especially after the censor board has passed it, is simply absurd. It makes me wonder if all it takes is a “holy word” to challenge the existing systems. - NANDHITHA HARIHARAN, 19, Student

The specific ban in Tamil Nadu doesn’t make sense to me. If a movie hurts a particular religion, the ban must be world-wide. The existence of a religion is not limited to a state. - RAAGA RAMESH, 21, B.Sc. Psychology

As told to POOJA MISHRA

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