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Friday Review » Faith

Updated: August 24, 2010 22:02 IST

Praised by enemies too

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'Talambralu' being poured on the idol of Lord Rama as part of the celestial wedding performed on the occasion of Sri Rama Navami in Vijayawada. File photo: Raju V.
THE HINDU 'Talambralu' being poured on the idol of Lord Rama as part of the celestial wedding performed on the occasion of Sri Rama Navami in Vijayawada. File photo: Raju V.

There can be no one who does not melt upon hearing the qualities of Rama. Therefore it is quite understandable that those who were fortunate to have lived in His time, and been a part of His life during His avatara, should have borne great love for Him. He was spoken of kindly even by those who were ill disposed towards Him, said Kurichi Sreenarayanachariar, in a lecture. If our loved ones and family and friends love us, that is nothing to be surprised about. But if a person is praised even by his enemies, then he must have had special qualities. Rama had many such endearing qualities, that made friend and foe alike, respect Him.

When Rama is dropped off at the forest, even the horses that draw the chariot are reluctant to go back. Plants wither in their sorrow. Even aquatic plants dry up, because the water has become hot with Rama's separation.

Rama's words to Sumantra, show His magnanimity and concern for others, two qualities that are present in Him in such large measure, that they alone are enough to justify the kind of affection everyone bore for Him. He asks Sumantra to convey to Dasaratha His respects. There is not a trace of bitterness in Rama's attitude to the father who banished Him to the forest. He has a request to Kausalya. She is to take good care of Dasaratha. Bharata is to be treated as a king. His message to Bharata is that he should not be unkind to Kaikeyi. Bearing Rama's messages to the members of his family who are still in Ayodhya, Sumantra leaves the forest.

Dasartha dies, heartbroken, and Bharata, who is visiting his maternal uncle, is summoned. He is shocked at the turn of events, and asks Kaikeyi why Rama has been banished. Only one who has committed unforgivable sins would have been banished. Had Rama committed treason? Had He coveted another's wife? Why then had He been exiled? Kaikeyi, although she is the cause for Rama's exile, tells Bharata that Rama is incapable of even looking at another man's wife. Who but Rama would impress people so much, that even if they were jealous of Him, even if they had caused Him difficulties in a fit of anger, they would still be unable to criticize Him?

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