Nandini milk, curd prices up by ₹2 a litre from November 24

November 23, 2022 09:06 pm | Updated November 24, 2022 01:04 am IST

Despite the hike, the consumer price of Nandini milk will still remain cheaper compared to that in Andhra Pradesh, Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Maharashtra, Gujarat, and Delhi

Despite the hike, the consumer price of Nandini milk will still remain cheaper compared to that in Andhra Pradesh, Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Maharashtra, Gujarat, and Delhi

While a litre of toned milk will now cost ₹39, a kg of curd will cost ₹47

The price of Nandini milk and curd marketed by Karnataka Milk Federation (KMF) will go up by ₹2 a litre/ kg from Thursday. While a litre of toned milk will now cost ₹39, a kg of curd will cost ₹47.

Despite the hike, the consumer price of Nandini milk will still remain cheaper compared to that in Andhra Pradesh, Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Maharashtra, Gujarat, and Delhi where the price ranges from ₹40 a litre in Tamil Nadu to ₹55 a litre in Andhra Pradesh, according to data provided by KMF.

The decision was taken at a KMF meeting here on Wednesday that came after federation directors and officials met Chief Minister Basavaraj Bommai on November 21.

New price list
Toned milk (3% fat): ₹39/litre
Homogenised toned milk (3% fat): ₹40/litre
Homogenised cow milk (3.5% fat): ₹44/litre
Special milk (4% fat): ₹45/litre
Shubham milk (4.5% fat): ₹45/litre
Samrudhi milk (6% fat): ₹50/litre
Santrupthi homogenised milk (6% fat): ₹52/litre
Curd: ₹47 per kg

The KMF said it would pass on the hiked amount to its nearly one million member-farmers who bring milk to the village-level societies daily across the State.

While the KMF has been demanding a price revision by ₹5 a litre from last year, it unilaterally announced a hike of ₹3 a litre of milk and curd on November 14, taking the government by surprise. It was only after Mr. Bommai intervened that the new price was put on hold. Finally, the government on November 21 allowed the hike that would also safeguard the consumer interest, sources said.

Rise in input cost

The hike — after nearly two years and 10 months — has come at a time when small and marginal milk producers are moving away from dairy farming owing to rise in input costs and an almost stagnant/lower procurement price given by district milk unions or have started supplying to dairies that offer a higher price.

Currently, milk producers get between ₹27 and ₹31 a litre, depending on the milk union and fat content in the milk besides getting ₹5 a litre as an incentive from the State government. The additional ₹2 will help reduce the burden on the milk producers, who have been hit by nearly 30% hike in the input cost over the last two years.

Dip in procurement

KMF sources said the hike could bring about relief since a large number of farmers in the border districts, especially Kolar, had started supplying milk to private dairies that sell milk at a higher price. “The federation had seen a steep dip in procurement from a peak 94 lakh litres in June to about 78 lakh litres now.” The KMF has cited the price of milk marketed by private dairies in the State that range from ₹44 to ₹50 a litre.

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