Delhi High Court gets two new judges

Working strength of the court now at 31, against sanctioned number of 60

October 12, 2021 12:40 am | Updated 03:03 am IST - New Delhi

A view of Delhi High Court, in New Delhi. File

A view of Delhi High Court, in New Delhi. File

Two new judges of the Delhi High Court were sworn in on Monday, taking the working strength of the court to 31 against a sanctioned strength of 60.

Chief Justice D.N. Patel admini stered the oath of office to Justices Yashwant Varma and Chandra Dhari Singh, who were transferred to Delhi from the Allahabad High Court. Justice Varma was elevated as additional judge of Allahabad HC in October 2014 and took oath as permanent judge in February 2016. He graduated in law from Rewa University in 1992 and got enrolled as an advocate in 1992.

Justice Varma practised mainly on the civil side handling varied nature of matters relating to constitutional, industrial disputes, corporate, taxation, environment and allied branches of law. He was also the special counsel for the Allahabad High Court from 2006 till elevation.

Justice Singh was appointed as additional judge of the Allahabad HC in September 2017 and took oath as permanent judge in September 2019. He graduated in law from Delhi University in 1993 and got enrolled as an advocate in 1994.

Justice Singh practised in the Supreme Court of India as an “Advocate-on Record”. He has also worked as Additional Advocate General for the State of Chhattisgarh, Standing Counsel for the State of Madhya Pradesh, Standing Counsel for the State of Uttar Pradesh, Standing Counsel for the State of Jharkhand, Senior Panel Counsel for Union of India, amongst others.

The Supreme Court collegium headed by Chief Justice of India N.V. Ramana, had recently recommended the transfer/retransfer of 17 High Court judges, including that of Justices Varma and Singh.

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