ISKCON’s 70-storey skyscraper temple in Vrindavan will ‘boost Indian tourism’

The Vrindavan Heritage Tower is an octagonal structure with a north wing, south wing, east wing and west wing

April 16, 2024 08:43 am | Updated 08:50 am IST - Washington

Being built at a cost of $80 million, Vrindavan Heritage Tower will be 70 floors high and 210 metres.

Being built at a cost of $80 million, Vrindavan Heritage Tower will be 70 floors high and 210 metres. | Photo Credit: vcm.org.in

A skyscraper Krishna temple in Vrindavan, Uttar Pradesh would emerge as a major display of Indian culture internationally and would boost tourism in India and local economy, a top ISKCON leader said.

There can’t be a broken infrastructure for spirituality and temples can't be in perpetual disrepair, Chanchalapathi Dasa, vice chairman and co-mentor of the Global Hare Krishna Movement and senior vice president of ISKCON Bangalore told PTI in an interview.

Being built at a cost of $80 million, Vrindavan Heritage Tower will be 70 floors high and 210 metres.

“And another example, I'll tell you, our honourable Prime Minister has been making a statement, giving a call to the Indian diaspora. Please bring five Americans from America to bring them to India and show them India. When you bring them to India, of course, anybody who's coming from any part of the world, when they're coming to India, they're looking for spirituality," he said.

“Of course, they may see good airports. All those things are also impressive and interesting and it should be there. They're also looking for spirituality. So we must have spiritual infrastructures, religious infrastructures, which you can be proud of, to bring foreigners and show them. And when you bring them to Vrindavan, you must be able to show this kind of world-class infrastructure built around the message of Krishna. And so that is another important objective,” the ISKCON leader said explaining about the upcoming Vrindavan Heritage Tower.

By reinforcing the links between culture and development through tourism, the project will lead the accelerated socio-economic development of the Braj region, ensuring equitable benefits to the local community, Mr. Dasa said, adding that strengthening infrastructure is the key to growth in Indian tourism.

“India’s heritage infrastructure will attract the world’s thinkers, leaders, and others to engage in philosophical discussions and cultural exchange programs, he noted.

Mr. Dasa said Vrindavan Heritage Tower is an octagonal structure with a north wing, south wing, east wing and west wing. These are the four temples.

Then there are three temples and one memorial Srila Prabhupada on the fourth site,” he said.

The temple complex will house comfortable accommodation facilities that create a home away from home and enhance the experience of the tourists.

Indian culture and heritage will bring about a true awakening and create a nation full of talent, creativity and energy, and adorned with exalted values and character, he said.

“Currently, we have been told that 20 million people come to Vrindavan. The Government of Uttar Pradesh tourism estimates say that in the next six to 10 years, it is going to become five times more, which is 100 million. Our plans are to be able to cater to a very large number.

“We are creating one of the biggest parking facilities, multi-level parking, which can park 3,000 cars at a time, he said, adding that they were planning to be able to handle about 2,00,000 people every day and on festival days much higher,” Mr. Dasa said.

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