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Relief for motorists using Mysuru Road

BMRCL to restore a part of the road and reconstruct pavements

September 26, 2019 09:41 pm | Updated 09:41 pm IST

Mysuru Road near the Bangalore University gate.

Mysuru Road near the Bangalore University gate.

Coming under attack for not maintaining roads in a motorable condition while implementing Phase II of the Namma Metro project, the Bangalore Metro Rail Corporation Limited (BMRCL) has decided to repair a stretch of Mysuru Road from Nayandahalli station to NICE road. The recent spate of rains had exacerbated the problems with motorists taking to Twitter to vent their angst.

The BMRCL will be spending ₹10.79 crore to restore the road, drains and reconstruction of the footpath. In 2016, under Phase II of Namma Metro, work was taken up on extension of the Purple Line from Mysuru Road station to Kengeri. Motorists and pedestrians have a tough time navigating the stretch owing to metro pillars on the median.

In some areas, the road has not been widened adequately. Pavements remain non-existent for the most part despite BMRCL's promise to build them on either side of the road. As a result, pedestrians are forced to walk on the uneven road adding to the chaos. Dust on account of the construction work is another health hazard.

The decision of the BMRCL to restore the stretch has come as a relief to thousands of motorists. A tender has already been floated and work is expected to be completed within six months after the contract is awarded.

Motorists have called for BMRCL to look at other affected stretches, especially Bannerghatta Road.

Hemanth S., a motorist, said, “Wherever metro work is happening in the city, the authorities concerned are not doing enough to keep roads in good condition. When it rains, roads get water-logged and traffic literally crawls. After Kengeri, it takes at least 45 minutes to reach the city during peak hours due to narrow roads and poor road condition."

Many motorists and residents pointed out that Mysuru Road will see more traffic during Dasara.

Vijay Kumar, a motorist, said: “In addition to widening of the road, there is a need to build good footpaths. Pedestrians have been facing a tough time for years due to metro work. The BMRCL must make sure that all footpaths are kept in good condition near metro stations so that people have easy access when they are opened to the public.”

According to B.L. Yashwanth Chavan, Chief PRO of BMRCL, most of the civil work has been completed. As per the policy, the road will be restored by BMRCL. Once restoration work is completed, the road will be handed over to the BBMP. “This has been the practice even in Phase I,” he said.

The BMRCL is planning to open the extension of Purple Line metro for commercial operations by October 2020.

Double road cutting charges

Bruhat Bengaluru Mahanagara Palike (BBMP) Commissioner B.H. Anil Kumar, on Thursday, inspected roads in Horamavu and Kasturinagar that have been dug up by the Bangalore Water Supply and Sewerage Board to lay pipelines.

After the inspection, he interacted with residents.

At Horamavu, he urged citizens to apply for water and underground drainage connections to their houses within the next 30 days. The BBMP would take up road repair thereafter.

“If any citizen cuts the road for a connection after the road repair is done, the BBMP will charge double for road cutting and obstructing public work,” he said.

Kasturinagar residents had recently staged a protest against BBMP and BWSSB for delay in completing development work. After interacting with citizens, the commissioner reportedly directed the officials concerned to expedite the work.

Potholes: 18 engineers fined

After a spell of rains over the past few days, many roads wear a weathered look. Potholes have appeared on the roads.

The Bruhat Bengaluru Mahanagara Palike (BBMP) Commissioner has directed engineers to fill these potholes immediately to ensure that motorists are not inconvenienced, nor is vehicular movement affected. Engineers who fail to maintain quality while filling potholes are being penalised by the civic body.

According to information available, 18 engineers from across the city have been levied penalties ranging from ₹1,000 to ₹5,000. A total penalty of ₹42,000 has been collected so far. This, senior officials said, would be deducted directly from the salaries of the engineers.

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