The right to walk with dignity

Street play draws attention over pedestrian problems, making walkability safe

November 01, 2012 10:17 am | Updated June 22, 2016 03:07 pm IST - NEW DELHI

Students of Curtin University, Australia, giving a street performance, ‘To walk or not to walk’, at Nehru Place in New Delhi. Photo: V.V. Krishnan

Students of Curtin University, Australia, giving a street performance, ‘To walk or not to walk’, at Nehru Place in New Delhi. Photo: V.V. Krishnan

A street performance of “To walk or not to walk” was staged by students of Curtin University, Australia, along with Smita Bharti Theatre Group at Nehru Place here on Tuesday to raise public awareness about problems being faced by pedestrians, as revealed by a survey undertaken in Nehru Place and Jor Bagh a few days ago.

The performance was also aimed at sensitising the public on the existing pedestrian infrastructure. According to Anjlee Agarwal of Samarthyam, which had conducted the “walkability” audits at the two places on October 27 along with Clean Air Initiative for Asian Cities (CAI-Asia) and Curtin University, Australia, the street performance highlighted the “right to walk”.

“We also focused on the required design standards and elements to make walkability safe, dignified and comfortable for all pedestrians and public transport users irrespective of their gender, age and disability,” said Ms. Agarwal.

The survey had earlier assessed “walkability” within a 500-metre radius of the two Delhi Metro stations. “During the survey, we had discovered a large number of problems in the area. For example, the stretch of road from Eros Hotel to Baha’i Temple is poorly lit and it is in areas such as these that issues like eve-teasing occur,” Ms. Agarwal said.

Apart from this, the walkability survey revealed that at most places the footpaths were too high, there were open manholes which posed a grave threat to pedestrians and encroachments affected the movement of pedestrians, she added.

Top News Today

Comments

Comments have to be in English, and in full sentences. They cannot be abusive or personal. Please abide by our community guidelines for posting your comments.

We have migrated to a new commenting platform. If you are already a registered user of The Hindu and logged in, you may continue to engage with our articles. If you do not have an account please register and login to post comments. Users can access their older comments by logging into their accounts on Vuukle.