OPINION

Pub violence

The one-member commission of the National Commission for Women, set up to inquire the Mangalore pub episode, has deplored the “disproportionate media hype” over the incident. With the advent of 24-hour news channels, the media have started overplaying and constantly replaying even small things, perhaps because there is nothing much to broadcast for 24 hours. The 80-hour live telecast during the Mumbai terror attacks, which actually ended up helping the terrorists, and the blowing up of the Mangalore incident, are signs of the widespread disease. The print media are forced to follow suit to give a wider publicity to the news already broken by the visual media. This trend is highly condemnable and harmful.

M.D. Ravikanth,

Chennai



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I was hurt on reading that instead of demanding a ban on the Sri Ram Sene, NCW member Nirmala Venkatesh has blamed the pub staff for not protecting the women who were roughed up. Does she really think the pub staff can protect women from 40 men who come prepared to strike violence? Why would pub-owners invest huge money in protecting women? Won’t they find it more profitable to convert it into a men-only pub?

Gorvika Rao,

New Delhi



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No doubt what happened in Mangalore is not justifiable by civil society standards. But the media hype is regrettable. It is clear that the electronic media had prior information of the violence in the pub but did nothing to prevent it. Whenever a society or country undergoes a change, some elements resist it. Their means of resistance differ. By giving excessive media coverage to such elements, we not only give undue publicity to them but also frighten the liberals. Not a single woman who was beaten up in the Mangalore pub has come forward to lodge a police complaint. At the end of the day, the media made heroes out of villains and instilled a sense of fear in the minds of liberals.

P.V. Raj Shekhar,

Hyderabad



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The violence in the Mangalore pub, perpetrated by activists of the Sri Ram Sene, is shameful. Why don’t such groups flaunt their so-called moral strength when incidents like the Mumbai attacks take place? Had even a few of them assisted the police and the NSG commandos in the counter-attack on the terrorists in Mumbai, many more lives could have been saved.

Pushpita Dutta,

New Delhi



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In recent years, we have started enjoying the fruits of globalisation. Changing work culture and sudden affluence have changed the lifestyle of our youngsters sooner than we anticipated. So all religious outfits think young girls visiting pubs and similar acts are undesirable. But that does not mean they can encroach into the personal lives of others. What activists of the Sri Ram Sene did in Mangalore is unacceptable and the law must deal with them suitably.

N.K. Das Gupta,

Kolkata



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Even high school students throng fashionable eating joints in cars and two-wheelers, in the name of partying. The parents simply grin and bear with them as they are frightened of losing their pampered offspring. The pub culture has taken deep root and it is impossible to eliminate it.

B.R. Kumar,

Chennai



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The reason attributed to the attack on the Mangalore pub by the self-declared moral police is that pubs are against Indian culture. Indian culture has evolved over the centuries and has assimilated many things from different cultures. Those who really want to preserve culture should stem the rot that has set into our ethos in the form of corruption and other vices.

Vasanth Bhatt,

Mangalore

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