NEW DELHI

Recording the journey of Metro

NEW DELHI OCT. 26. Tracing how the physical and technological scale of the construction of the Delhi Metro was an extension of the great building tradition of Delhi, which has been celebrated for erecting great monuments and works of public utility by the rulers since time-immemorial, the Delhi Metro Rail Corporation has come out with a coffee-table book, "A Dream Revisited'', that takes an archival journey into the making of the system.

Delving into how from the times of the legendary "Indraprastha'' of the Pandavas, Delhi has fascinated travellers like Ibn Batuta, who had described Delhi in his book (Travels in Asia and Africa: 1334-1342 A.D.) as "the grand metropolis of India, a vast and magnificent city combining beauty with strength...'', the book puts the physical and technological scale of the construction of the Delhi Metro Rail into perspective; saying it is only an extension of the great building tradition of the city.

"Be it the 11th century Rajput reservoirs, the ancient iron pillar at the imposing Qutab complex, the 14th century Khilji and Tughlaq waterworks and canals, the forts, palaces and gardens, the old railway bridge over Yamuna, the old secretariat building, India Gate and its environs, Connaught Place ... each one of them reflect on the city's timeless grandeur,'' it points out.

Brought out in hard cover, the highly illustrative book - that is being sold at all the 10 operational stations of the Delhi Metro - brings out the history of the system and documents the "photogenic progress'' of the system with excerpts from some of the media reports on it.

In the words of the Managing Director of DMRC, E. Sreedharan, the book brings out the "complexities faced during construction, the feats of engineering, the decision-making behind the adoption of world-class technologies, the operations-related accomplishments, the human aspects of the whole effort - the commissioning of the Shahdara-Tis Hazari section of the Delhi Metro within the stipulated time frame has been a small, but immensely important stride, on a long journey.''

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