NEW DELHI

Painting with passion

Mandira Nayar

NEW DELHI: Her paintings hang on powerful walls. From being taken round the world by the Indian Council for Cultural Relations (ICCR) to being part of the collections of top government officials, Shuchi Khanna's work has been noticed in the right circles.

Her latest exhibition in the Capital that explores the relationship among man, woman and nature beyond the limitation of thought is as diverse in terms of style as it is expansive in its theme.

"I have been very patient collecting paintings for the past two years for this exhibition. There are about 35 canvases in all. I have tried working with many different mediums acrylic, watercolours and even ink. I have diversified my style according to the theme," explains Shuchi.

Bringing together various thoughts in different ways, the paintings explore the theme in new dimensions. From looking at it from a woman's point of view to finding a spiritual level with her Krishna series, she might choose soft colours, but her work is bold.

Truly involved with her work, she not only spends time painting on canvases but also initiates others into the colourful experience. A teacher here at Sanskriti School, she has managed to make her passion her career.

"I teach children of Class XI and XII commercial art. Painting is my first love. I think I always wanted to be an artist. My father is an aeronautical engineer, but he always supported me. Luckily I married into a family that encouraged me, so my journey has been quite smooth," she says.

While her first exhibition focused on the spiritual and brought alive "Gayatri Mantra" on her canvases, her latest exhibition zeroes in on more earthly concerns. On display at ABN AMRO Bank, M-6, Hauz Khaz, up to November 30, her paintings are well worth a look for more than just her skill.

Chosen as one of the women artists who participated in a national exhibition on International Women's Day, Shuchi has used her art for a cause. Having participated in an art exhibition for a fund-raiser for the Kashmir earthquake victims recently, Shuchi has used her art for more than just pleasure. "I sometimes paint late into the night and on other days I cannot paint at all. Painting is my passion," she says.

And judging by the way her preview went, her paintings are a passion for more people than just her.