NEW DELHI

Bidding adieu to BRT system in wake of boiling oil prices

Staff Reporter



The cost of travelling by personal transport is about to rise sharply

‘The signalling system is being made automatic and CMS has been entrusted with the task’



NEW DELHI: At a time when the price of crude is on the boil, above 120 dollar per barrel, and projected to go even higher, Delhi is all set to bid adieu to a “modern and scientifically planned Bus Rapid Transit system” that according to its authors could have provided a cheap, safe and reliable mass transport system to the people.

But while a further increase in the prices of petroleum and diesel now appears imminent and the cost of travelling by personal transport is about to rise sharply, intense pressure has made the Delhi Government almost buckle and give up on the project that was aimed at providing an opportunity to a large number of people to give up personal transport and travel by public transport instead.

Following a high-level meeting on Tuesday, it was decided that while the status quo would be maintained on the existing 5.8 km Ambedkar Nagar-Moolchand Hospital, the remaining corridors would be constructed in a different style – almost shedding all the important features of the existing BRT corridor.

Delhi Chief Secretary Rakesh Mehta said that on the remaining section of the BRT corridor from Moolchand Hospital to Delhi Gate, the bus shelters would be on the left of the road. Also, he said, there would be no segregation with concrete blocks and the lanes would be demarcated with other material.

The change in design would take place within ten days and thereafter construction on the remaining corridor, which had been suspended late in April, would be resumed.

“The 5.8 km section is like Model 1 and the remaining section would be Model 2. We would see how they work and then get them evaluated by an independent agency. Thereafter we would embark on construction of the entire 300 km of such corridors,” he said.

As for the existing 5.8 km section, he clarified that the bus shelters would remain in the middle of the road and not be demolished.

“We are streamlining that section. The signalling system is being made automatic and CMS has been entrusted the task of installing and ensuring its proper and continuous running.” IIT Delhi Professor Geetam Tiwari who has been associated with the BRT system since its inception said even in the newer sections dedicated lanes for pedestrians and cyclists would remain.

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