KARNATAKA

Mahad has good vision now

RECUPERATING: Mahad Mehmood and his parents, Mehmood Chhotani and Jameela, at Narayana Nethralaya in Bangalore on Tuesday with the surgeon who conducted the operation, Arun Samprathi (left). — Photo: K. Gopinathan

RECUPERATING: Mahad Mehmood and his parents, Mehmood Chhotani and Jameela, at Narayana Nethralaya in Bangalore on Tuesday with the surgeon who conducted the operation, Arun Samprathi (left). — Photo: K. Gopinathan  

Eight-year-old boy from Pakistan has squint corrected by new technique

Staff Reporter

BANGALORE: Thanks to a new surgical technique, eight-year-old Mahad Mehmood from Pakistan, who had a squint in his right eye, now literally has a gleam in his eyes, minus the squint.

A squint can lead to permanent loss of vision, if not treated at an early age. Weakness of the optic muscles causes squint. Squint can be hereditary and is characterised by reduced vision and lack of depth perception.

Arun Samprathi, an ophthalmologist at Narayana Nethralaya who operated on Mahad said, "Operating on a child needs a more delicate approach by surgeons. I am satisfied with the post-operative condition of Mahad, and he is doing well."

Health tourism

K. Bhujang Shetty, Medical Director, Narayana Nethralaya, said, "Bangalore is becoming a destination for health tourism because equipment, expertise and experience with a personal touch are available here at less expensive rates than the U.S. and the European countries. One to two per cent of the population in India have squint. I request parents to let go of the myth that a squint will automatically disappear as a child grows older, and get it treated, preferably before a child is eight years old."

Jameela Mehmood Chhotani, the boy's mother, who hails from Bangalore and has been married to Mehmood Chhotani of Pakistan for 20 years, said, "My elder son had the same problem and was treated at Lakeside Hospital six years back, and he now has normal vision. So we decided to treat my younger son in Bangalore. Mahad has irritation in his eyes but is feeling much better than he did on Monday."

Mr. Chhotani said, "I request the Indian embassy to remove the mandatory police enquiry for medical cases. It is very difficult to get a visa to India and takes more than a month because of delays at the embassies both in India and Pakistan. There are no specialists for such cases back in Karachi or other cities in Pakistan. The operation cost me Rs. 15,000, and I hope I get a visa for the next mandatory check-up lined up for my son after six months."

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