KARNATAKA

COMED-K unlikely to share seats with Government



B.S. Ramesh

Managements feel the Government's request to accommodate some seats had come a little late

Many students and the Government had hoped that private professional colleges would `give up' some seats COMED-K is likely to conduct single window counselling for all the seats

BANGALORE: Private professional colleges are unlikely to share their seats with the Government at least this year.

They feel it is impossible for them to agree to the Government's request for a compromise on the issue at this point of time. Sources in the private college managements' group said on Thursday that it would be impossible for the managements to part with any seat since the entrance test for professional courses had been completed. They feel the Government's request to accommodate some seats had come a little late.

The Government had requested the managements of private professional colleges to part with some seats under the management quota to accommodate its students.

Many students and even the Government had hoped that the managements of private professional colleges would see reason and "give up" some seats. This hope was fuelled when the Government and representatives of private colleges held a meeting two days ago and decided to set up three committees to resolve the crisis. The meeting also fuelled a hope that a compromise was in the offing and the committees would be able to decide on seats in medical, engineering and dental courses. Many saw in the meeting a ceasefire between the two parties. However, the biggest stumbling block was the time factor.

The sources said that it would be impossible to part with any management seat to the Government at this point of time since private professional colleges had conducted their entrance test and the Consortium of Medical, Engineering and Dental Colleges of Karnataka (COMED-K) on Wednesday announced its rank list.

The COMED-K, which has 40,000 seats, is likely to conduct single window counselling for all the seats. Therefore, even if one seat is surrendered, it will amount to depriving a COMED-K candidate of a seat. Hence, the question of seat sharing with the Government is out of the question this year.

The sources said that if the Government had not resorted to arm-twisting and bringing about a law, the scenario would have been different.

Moreover, the proposal for seat sharing should to have come before the entrance test. Besides, the judgment of the Supreme Court also did not speak about seat sharing, the sources added.

The question is what remains now. Managements stated that the talks with the Government could only pertain to concession in the fee structure. Like last year, a multiple fee structure could be worked out. This benefit could be taken only by those candidates under the "reserved" category who had taken the entrance test conducted by COMED-K. Talks in the next few days would focus on this aspect and the State would have to take the lead in providing for subsidy in the fee structure.