KARNATAKA

City’s noise pollution level monitored

The sound from the engine of vehicles and horns, including air horns, contribute to the noise-levels.–FILE PHOTO

The sound from the engine of vehicles and horns, including air horns, contribute to the noise-levels.–FILE PHOTO  

The Karnataka State Council for Science and Technology (KSCST) has carried out an exercise to monitor noise pollution in Mysuru.

Mahesh Kashyap, who worked with KSCST as an environmental consultant, told The Hindu that the exercise was carried out at 16 locations across Mysuru over a period of 40-45 days with the help of student volunteers from Sri Jayachamarajendra College of Engineering and Vidya Vardhaka College of Engineering.

The locations covered include the road outside Mysuru Zoo, Mysuru-Bengaluru highway — Outer Ring Road junction, Ramanuja Road, Dasappa Circle and K R Circle in the city.

The noise levels were measured over a period of six to eight hours starting from 8 am on weekdays with the help of equipment made available by the two engineering colleges.

The sound from the engine of vehicles and horns, including air horns, contributed to the noise-levels.

KSCST took up the noise pollution monitoring exercise after it was approved by the Karnataka State Pollution Control Board (KSPCB). “We will shortly be submitting a report to KSPCB with a set of recommendations”, said Mr. Kashyap, while refusing to divulge the contents of the report.

Focus on Tier 2 cities

This exercise was carried out in Mysuru as the focus always remained on bigger cities like Bengaluru.

“There is a need to focus on Tier 2 cities … we chose Mysuru as it is one of the fastest growing Tier 2 cities. We plan to take up a similar exercise in Hubbali-Dharwad and other Tier 2 cities,” he said.

Meanwhile, KSPCB sources told The Hindu that it was up to the police and transport departments to act on complaints of noise pollution.

However, an exercise to measure noise pollution can also help police come up with solutions to regulate traffic on certain routes.

It may be mentioned here that the city police and KSPCB officials in Mysuru, acting on a complaint, had got the Karnataka State Road Transport Corporation (KSRTC) to replace shrill air horns with electric horns from its buses.

The shrill horns were emitting more sound that the ceiling stipulated under the Noise Pollution (Regulation and Control) Rules, 2000.

However, a KSPCB official pointed out that several private buses still continue to use shrill air horns.

However, the official was quick to add that it was up to the RTO to act against the menace by seizing such horns and penalising the buses.



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