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‘IPR will encourage innovations'

Srividya Ragavan, professor of Law and IPR, University of Oklahoma, speaking at the conference on ‘Best practices of IP management', in Hyderabad on Friday. Also seen are Anjan Das, Executive Director (Technology), CII, Prabha Sridevan, Chairperson, IPAB, Chennai, and Jaidev Galla, Chairman, CII-AP. — PHOTO: G. Krishnaswamy

Srividya Ragavan, professor of Law and IPR, University of Oklahoma, speaking at the conference on ‘Best practices of IP management', in Hyderabad on Friday. Also seen are Anjan Das, Executive Director (Technology), CII, Prabha Sridevan, Chairperson, IPAB, Chennai, and Jaidev Galla, Chairman, CII-AP. — PHOTO: G. Krishnaswamy  

Chairperson of the Intellectual Property Appellate Board (IPAB), Jusitice Prabha Sridevan, has stated that Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) regime is not to the disadvantage of India, as feared by many. It will encourage innovations and is an important driver in the knowledge-based economy.

In her inaugural address at the two-day conference on “Best practices of intellectual property management” here on Friday, she stressed the need for a right balance between IPR and human rights, particularly in developing countries like India as cases of IPR encroaching human rights were on the rise.

She said IPAB provided an opportunity to the industry and academia to strive for global leadership by harnessing IP. She, however, suggested that IPR should not be applied for plants, animals, micro organisms and therapeutic, surgical and medical interventions so as to keep the fruits of research and technological innovations in the reach of larger masses in countries like India.

Former Controller General of Patents, Trademark and Design, S. Chandrasekaran, said IP had little shelf life and its holders should make good out of it in that short span. In India, IP was mostly known as copyright and trademark and its management involved a company's ability to protect and commercialise its inventions, market its brands, licence the know-how, transfer technologies, conclude JVs and monitor and enforce.

Professor of Law and IPR in the University of Oklahoma, US, Srividya Ragavan, explained the IP management practices in the US and elaborated on the posthumous IP management. She said that companies were trying to capture other properties of their goods/services to continue their hold on them once the IPR period expired.

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