YOUNG WORLD

Food for thought

S.S. KAVITHA

GOOD FOOD FOR EVERYONE: All fun and some awareness too.

GOOD FOOD FOR EVERYONE: All fun and some awareness too.  

Why do some people always suffer from drowsiness? Do you know what to eat and what to avoid?

The human body is a bag of chemicals where millions of reactions "run the show." The nature of the reactions and the outcome depend on the materials that flow through the system. A balanced diet is necessary. There is no such thing as good and bad food; it all depends on the quantity and quality of food eaten at a given time. You can use the "food sword" to protect yourself or point it against you. Here are your choices, say the students of Idhayam Rajendran Residential School.

Exhibiting various vegetables, fresh fruits, cereals, fish, mutton and chicken, and dressed in their school uniform with hats displaying A, B, C, D, E and K representing the vitamins, the students made an effort to re-educate the passers-by and the local communities around Vadamalayan Hospitals City Centre.

For Children's Day, Vadamalayan Hospitals and Idhayam Rajendran Residential School organised the exhibition to highlight the importance of health. About 15 students explained the nutrient value of the fruits on display and warned of the various ailments that result from a lack or excess of them.

There is an increase in the number of child patients owing to the present sedentary lifestyle and dietary habits. "We thought of conducting the exhibition, so that it may be an eye-opener for children and parents," said Pugalagiri Vadamalayan, managing director, Vadamalayan Hospitals.

The need of the hour is to create awareness among the people and children who are increasingly tempted by junk food items that reduce the "productive longevity" of life, he said, and added that parents should take the lead in choosing the right food for themselves, encouraging the children to follow them.

Owing to the success of the camp, he said, "We have planned to make it an annual affair with more stalls."

Principal S. Anthonyraj said the camp has helped teach the students nutritional values, as well as improving their communication skills.

Theodora Sladem, teacher, said many concentrate upon what is tasty, ignoring potential harmful dietary effects.

The hospital authorities also conducted a medical camp where the children were screened for eye problems and received a general health check-up. As many as 500 children attended.