SUNDAY MAGAZINE

Kolkata

FROM campfires of Mughal soldiers to the royal banquet tables of kings and emperors, the kebab has travelled a long way. Originally al fresco food, chefs have enthusiastically adopted the kebab over the centuries to give it countless forms, tastes, textures and fragrances. Dawat-e-Kebab, the Kebab Festival at Saffron, The Park, on from November 14 to December 1, is a celebration of this culinary creation. And the kebabs are being prepared by the Qureshi brothers, Irfan and Ashfaque, sons of the legendary Grand Master Chef Imtiaz Qureshi. Kolkata's gourmets will be able to savour such legends as Hyderabad's Shikampur, Delhi's Dora Kabab and Lucknow's Gilawati Kabab.

* * *

Kolkata

PENGUIN India and the British Council at the Taj Bengal will launch well-known author William Dalrymple's latest book White Mughals on November 15. Following this on November 16 Calcuttans will get the opportunity to enjoy a reading from the book done by the author himself at Oxford Bookstore and Gallery. Highly acclaimed for books like City of the Djinns, Dalrymple's latest offering uncovers yet another enthralling facet of the fascinating, controversial and tumultuous history of colonial India. Dalrymple takes readers into this unexplored world of the White Mughals to narrate the web of intrigue and seduction, romance and treachery in the lives of colourful figures as James Kirpatrick the British Resident in Hyderabad who surmounted huge obstacles to marry Khair un-Nissa, "Hindoo Stuart", who travelled with his own team of Brahmins to maintain his templeful of idols; and others.

* * *

IF Dalrymple's book is instructive about how civilisations can (and did) meet, not clash, the poster exhibition being held at Max Muller Bhavan is a moving, powerful protest against the forces of intolerance and right-wing violence. The 50 posters articulate the shame and anger of young Germans at the violent attacks carried out against foreigners in the 1990s by a small minority of right-wing youngsters that shattered the image of a united Germany after the fall of the Berlin Wall. The stark simplicity and unnerving honesty of the posters — using a range of methods to convey their message from subtle irony to jarring shock, from cryptic suggestions to a direct narration — manage to say clearly what can perhaps not be articulated in words. On till November 23.

Recommended for you