METRO PLUS

One for the pub

Awesome foursome (from left) Sharon, Nikhil, Asmita and Farina

Awesome foursome (from left) Sharon, Nikhil, Asmita and Farina  

AFTER THE ban of saris in discotheques a few years ago, the behenji-turned-mod took to Indo-western and western wear with grumbles. Again, in shades of pink that matched with the neon lights and the fabric — most favoured China silk! It took a suave breed of GenX, dressed in clubby hipsters, tops and skirts, and that important attitude — confidence without being self-conscious, to explain the need to wear appropriate, cool-yet-comfortable ensemble for discotheques and clubs. And now upmarket boutiques have begun to retail club wear, dedicating a decent rack space for soiree blacks and spaghetti dos, for the benefit of have-money-will-party junta.

"If you see the pr�t line today, one of the emerging area is club — lounge or party wear. Especially with the way club industry is growing in every city. There is a big gap, with more people looking for club wear, for designers to work on," says designer Nikhil. Agrees Asmita Marwah, "the club scene is evolving. I think we are there with the metros, with youngsters in the twin cities well turned out at gigs." Nikhil and Marwah happen to be two of four top designers whose club wear lines were showcased as part of the Blender's Pride Fashion Fringe, 2004.

The self-explanatory event, an ode to pub fashion, presented fringe concepts — mix and match, colours and more. "This is a new initiative of presenting latest trends in club wear, collecting a lot of current styles and putting it together," says Bikram Basu, general manager Seagram India (P) Ltd about the event that returned to the twin cities after the fashion tour early this year, with newer clubby autumn winter 2004 silhouettes from Suneet Verma, Rina Dhaka, Asmita Marwah and Nikhil and Shantanu.

Arguably non-kitsch, the lines read more drama. If sassy and youthful defined Suneet Verma's pink pub collection, Rina Dhaka interpreted the life of the `now' woman with her line apt for pub hopping-- coffee bar to a nightclub. Inspired by pre haute couture fashion movement from 18 Century Paris, `Spirit of Rococco' by Nikhil and Shantanu read glamour and opulence. "I have used colours from the Indian woman's wardrobe such as the haldi yellow and fused it with western silhouettes. You will find facets of silk, georgette and chiffon, the latter because it is lightweight," observes Nikhil.

One for the pub

Asmita's `diva' comprised glamorous and sensuous line in knits and georgettes for women and structured shirts for men with `unstitched seams' in cottons for men, "inspired by Hollywood styling of 50s. The club wear will be available at XLNC shortly," says Asmita who is also planning for a club line, come December.

With most of the lines from the party being retailed by local boutiques, revellers don't have to travel to Mumbai to shop for the New Year gig. But as regards the impact of the fashion party, only the coming weeks at the pubs here will tell.

SYEDA FARIDA

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