METRO PLUS

Humour in the big line

MOCK SYMBOLISM One of Tapan Dash's masterpiece

MOCK SYMBOLISM One of Tapan Dash's masterpiece  





Tapan paints with a simplicity that mocks the perspective with exaggeration

Symbolism is not new to Indian art and mythology. Ravana is described as a 10-headed monster, just to communicate to the lay reader his high intellectual abilities. Tapan Dash takes some of the symbolism that's part of Indian culture and blends it with his artistic sensibilities to create, shocking and at moments jarring works of art.Disconcerting to the extreme, Dash is a master of the line. Given a proper brush and paint, perhaps he can draw a line to the end of the world and back without a break. Using this robust line, and a childish glee for bright primary colours, Tapan paints with a simplicity that mocks the perspective with exaggeration. The human anatomy is twisted out of shape to create mock symbolism, the bright colours, and the motif of a red twisted chilli add to a sense of wry humour the painter tries to splash on his canvases which otherwise appear sedate. Just to show one aspect of it, Tapan draws a mendicant deep in meditation, but with a twist: he has a red chilli in one of his open palm. On the other canvases, the chillies take on different forms, different colours, moving on from a humour motif to something more meaningful and more thought provoking. The humour, Tapan indulges in can be seen in the perspective where he uses the parallax effect to show the split personalities. A face is not just a single thing, seen through Tapan's eyes, painted on his canvas, it appears like the many sided thing with varied thoughts streaming through it.SERISH NANISETTI





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