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Colourful strokes

It was a confluence of a different kind — where strokes of paint merged with the stitches on fabrics

Some like to wear plain clothes , while others like them sprinkled with stones, antique zardosi and embroidery. But now, hand painting on fabric is in vogue.

Vibrant blues and greens to soft peaches and mauves in fabrics as varied as jute, jute silk, chiffon, crepes and tissue bring a classic finish to the fabric. Fashion is all about reinvention and revitalisation. This was reflected in ensembles designed by first year students of the department of Costume Design and Fashion of the CSI Bishop Appasamy College of Arts and Science at a workshop on painting organised by the college recently.

Colourful strokes

There was a demo on how to use different strokes and colours to bring out the required designs. The students were taught how to give a contemporary treatment to old craft and makeover fabrics. Students also got an opportunity to learn about pot painting and nail art at the workshop.

"In pot painting, various designs are evolved on a basic background. Methods like blowing gold dust on a wet background, marbelling (mixing paint with water and dipping the pot in it), dipping and rolling brings out new designs," says S. Rama Rajesh, one of the resource persons at the workshop.

"Fabric painting plays an important role in adding value-addition in sarees, salwars, jeans and tops and a variety of garments. Such workshops help fashion students experiment with different designs," says Rama. She runs the Palettez art gallery in Tirupur.

"There is a lot of hand craft involved in hand painting and each is a laborious process, but the results are excellent. Colours like bright red, green and maroon make it more vibrant," she says.

Students were taught everything from how to hold a brush to mixing colours to the precautions to be taken.

Tips were also given on how to design a wall mount, using chart papers, that is used as a backdrop for ramp shows, foil on glass work and making paper bags .

She also taught them how to mould flowers, grapes and birds using m-seal. These are used as value-additions in pot painting.

Says Sheela, department head, the students learn the basics here and that come in handy when they turn full-time designers. The department will shortly organise a designer contest for fashion students and budding designers from the Southern States.

K. JESHI

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