METRO PLUS

A piece of democracy

CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT? Shyam Sukhramani says the old-make Levis supersedes any fashion fad

CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT? Shyam Sukhramani says the old-make Levis supersedes any fashion fad   | Photo Credit: Photo: Rajeev Bhatt



The blue jeans is 135 years old and getting younger

Any wardrobe is incomplete without this one. It is what every fashion designer, ever celebrity will vouch for. The quintessential blue jeans turned 135 years old recently. Seems like a really long time, isn’t it? But the reality is that this humble piece of clothing is only getting younger with age. May 20, 1873 is when Levi Strauss along with Jacob Davis, a tailor from Nevada, received the U.S. patent on the process designing men’s pants with metal rivets. That led to the creation of the legendary 501 jeans, which still sells like hot cakes.

Definitely what we wear now is nowhere close to what it originally was. The rough and tough material has made way for softer and more manageable fabric, and the original indigo colour has split into different hues. The cuts have changed, the looks have changed but the attitude remains intact. “Jeans has survived because it is the most democratic garment ever created by man. It doesn’t matter whether you are thin or fat, you can always find a pair that fits you,” explains says Shyam Sukhramani, Director, Marketing, Levi’s India, which celebrated the occasion with a Timeless Jeans Fest at their store in South Extension.

Adapting cultures

But is it just that which makes the blue jeans so popular with people? It has much to do with its ability to adapt to cultures. “You can create any desired kind of a look with jeans, and that’s one reason it fits into every generation,” adds Shyam. Wear it below an ethnic kurta or kurti, and you will get a chic-Indian look. Team it with a T-shirt for a casual, and with a blazer for a semi-formal feel. A brand like Levi’s even customises the material according to the country. “India is summery throughout. So the fabric we use is lighter and comfortable enough to be worn throughout the year,” he explains.

The popularity of jeans is somewhat amazing considering that it was initially meant for the hardworking labours. But today most brands target the progressive youth. Even the new trends are created keeping them in mind.

Fashion changes every season, and jeans too have kept pace. A new cut or style is unveiled every few months. “We don’t drive trends. We only put out garments as per customers need. Be it low-waist or slim fit, there’s a demand for such innovations,” points out Shyam. The choice is ever expanding. As newer patterns come in, does it signify the death of the classic straight fit jeans?

It is a common complaint that these are fast disappearing from the shelves. “Yes, it is true that one may not find a plain straight-fit jeans at our stores sometimes, but that’s also because majority of the buyers want what’s in. But the classic look will remain forever and it supersedes any fashion fad.”

MANGALA RAMAMOORTHY

Recommended for you