FRIDAY REVIEW

United we sing

Krishnan Natarajan.

Krishnan Natarajan.  

I n the increasingly strife-ridden world, certain clichés deserve to be repeated. So, no matter how many times we have heard that music knows no boundaries of language, that devotion is not limited to any one religion, and that artistes have only the one creed of art, there is no sense of ennui when we see these concepts in practice. This is the sort of thing that took place when Krishnan Natarajan, an IIM graduate-turned-Hindustani classical vocalist from the Rampur-Sahaswan gharana, presented a devotional concert in New Delhi the other day.

The concert with Hindustani and Carnatic elements was organised on the occasion of the International Conference on Science and Spirituality – The Growing Interface at Sri Sathya Sai International Centre for Human Values. His Meera and Kabir bhajans in the Hindustani style, Carnatic kritis of Tyagaraja and Satya Sai bhajans left the audience both impressed and moved. He was accompanied on the harmonium by Ustad Mehmud Dhaulpuri and on the tabla by Satish Kumar.

The recital included melodious Meera and Kabir bhajans like “Maya maha thagini re hum jani” and also “Pag ghungroo bandh Meera nachi re”. The audience sang along with him in chorus when he recited “Hari bhajan bin sukh shanti nahi” and “Subramaniam Subramaniam”, which are Sai bhajans and popular the world over among devotees.

Another bhajan that was highly appreciated was “Sabarmati ke sant tune kar diya kamal”, which the versatile musician played on the violin. He concluded the performance with a shabad in raga Bhairavi.



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