BUSINESS

Five Indian car models fail Global NCAP’s crash tests

Five popular Indian car models have failed the crash test carried out by Global NCAP, a U.K.-based safety and testing organisation.

The latest results on crash tests on Indian cars, released by Global NCAP, have rated all five models tested by it - Renault Kwid, Maruti Suzuki Celerio, Maruti Suzuki Eeco, Mahindra Scorpio and Hyundai Eon – in the zero-star category. According to the test results, all of them showed low levels of adult occupant protection.

Renault Kwid

The Renault Kwid was tested in three versions, including one with airbags, but each was rated as ‘zero star’ for adult safety.

“The latest SaferCarsforIndia results show how important it is for cars to have a body shell that can remain stable in a crash,” said David Ward, Secretary General of Global NCAP.

“This is an absolutely crucial pre-requisite for occupant safety together with fitment of at least front air bags. It is very surprising that a manufacturer like Renault introduced the Kwid initially lacking this essential feature. “Car-makers must ensure that their new models pass the United Nation’s minimum crash test regulations and support use of an airbag,” he said. Welcoming Renault’s efforts to correct this, he said, “we look forward to testing another improved version with airbags.”

Global NCAP tested the standard version of the Kwid without airbags. It scored zero-star in adult occupant protection and two stars in child occupant protection. Following safety improvements, Renault proposed that Global NCAP test an updated evolution of the Kwid in production from early April 2016. The car was tested with and without an airbag.

The new Kwid without an airbag scored zero star in the adult occupant protection and two stars in child occupant protection. The structure did not collapse. However, it was rated as unstable.“It was possible to see the structural reinforcements implemented in this version of the Kwid but when Global NCAP checked the left (passenger) side, there were no reinforcements. The structure was reinforced only on the driver side,’’ according to the statement.The new Kwid with the addition of driver airbag was also tested. This version also scored zero star in the adult occupant protection and two stars in child occupant protection.

Hyundai Eon

Global NCAP said, “Hyundai Eon is offered in the standard version without airbags. It scored zero star in the adult occupant protection and two stars in child occupant protection’’.

The unstable structure in the passenger compartment and the lack of airbags explained the poor result in adult occupant protection. A Hyundai Motor India Ltd. (HMIL) spokesman said “Hyundai vehicles are designed and build to meet all the prescribed safety standards set by the Indian regulatory authorities.”

Maruti Celerio

The non-airbag Maruti Suzuki Celerio scored zero star in adult occupant protection and one star in child occupant protection. The lack of airbags explained the poor result in adult occupant protection. Likewise, the non-airbag Eeco also scored zero star in the adult occupant protection and one star in child occupant protection.

“All our products are safe. They meet the safety standards of India and in most cases, exceed them.

“The tests by global NCAP are conducted at speeds that are higher than those prescribed by the regulatory authorities not only in India but in Europe and U.S.A.,” according to a Maruti Suzuki statement.

Mahindra Scorpio

Mahindra Scorpio scored zero star in the adult occupant protection and two stars in child occupant protection. “The star rating released by Global NCAP (GNCAP) in the latest crash test was conducted on non-airbag variant of the Scorpio.

Typically, in any star rating process, non-airbag variants do not perform well on safety standards.

“Most variants of the Scorpio are equipped with airbags and a safety package. Approximately 75 per cent of Scorpio customers choose the air bags variants of the vehicle,’’ according to an M&M statement.



Car makers must ensure that their new models pass the United Nation’s minimum crash test regulations



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