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Plan to make biomedical waste disposal safer

listing priorities: Special Secretary, Health and Project Director of Tamil Nadu Health Systems Project P.W.C. Davidar explains biomedical waste management at a workshop in Coimbatore on Thursday.

listing priorities: Special Secretary, Health and Project Director of Tamil Nadu Health Systems Project P.W.C. Davidar explains biomedical waste management at a workshop in Coimbatore on Thursday.  

Special Correspondent

The programme, to begin in July, will involve tie-ups with private parties through shredding, deep burial

COIMBATORE: The State is set to begin more scientific and safer disposal of biomedical waste generated in government hospitals, including those attached to medical colleges, and primary health centres with at least 30 beds.

The programme, expected to begin by July, will involve tie-ups with private parties for disposal through shredding, deep burial or other methods.

By the end of June, all the institutions would be provided with colour-coded bins to collect different types of biomedical waste, P.W.C. Davidar, Special Secretary, Health, and Project Director of the Tamil Nadu Health Systems Project, told presspersons here on Thursday.

“Tamil Nadu is the first State to get into biomedical waste management in a big way. The government has allocated Rs. 11 crore for the programme,” he said after a workshop on the programme for Deans of medical colleges, Joint Directors and Deputy Directors of Health Services and Chief Medical Officers of government hospitals in nine districts.

Organisations specialising in waste management would train hospital staff in handling and segregating waste.

Nine common disposal facilities run by private parties in the State would remove waste from hospitals. The charges would be on a per-kg basis.

Charges on a per-bed, per-day basis were being levied in areas such as Coimbatore. Tenders have been invited for this.

Close monitoring

When it was pointed out that the per-kg charge could give room for a part of the waste not being handed over, Mr. Davidar said there would be close monitoring to prevent this. Expert adviser for the project M. Kamakshi said every hospital would have an infection control officer.

The Special Secretary would be the convener of a State-level committee to oversee the programme. Infection control committees in government hospitals would be headed by the chief medical officers.

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