Chess World Championship, Gukesh vs Ding Liren: Delhi joins Chennai and Singapore in race to host the event

The International Chess Federation (FIDE) CEO Emil Sutovsky on June 1 said all three cities have submitted their bids and they "meet the criteria".

Updated - June 01, 2024 02:57 pm IST

Published - June 01, 2024 02:53 pm IST - New Delhi

Chennai, New Delhi and Singapore are in race to host the Chess World Championship  between D. Gukesh and Ding Liren.

Chennai, New Delhi and Singapore are in race to host the Chess World Championship between D. Gukesh and Ding Liren. | Photo Credit: AP

Delhi has joined Chennai and Singapore in the race to host the World Championship match between D. Gukesh and China's Ding Liren after the All India Chess Federation backed the national capital's bid while accusing the Tamil Nadu government of acting unilaterally by pushing the southern city's name.

The International Chess Federation (FIDE) CEO Emil Sutovsky on June 1 said all three cities have submitted their bids and they "meet the criteria".

Sutovsky added Chennai was the first to bid for the much-anticipated match in November-December this year, while the New Delhi bid came in last.

"Three bids to host the FIDE World Championship Match-2024. Chennai, Singapore, New Delhi (in order of submission). All meet the criteria," Sutovsky wrote on 'X'.

  

The international chess body's council will discuss the issue and announce the winner later this month.

"Next week FIDE Council to discuss it — representatives of the bidders invited to share details and take questions. Final decision in June," Sutovsky added.

The Chennai bid was made by the Sports Development Authority of Tamil Nadu while the All Indian Chess Federation bid for New Delhi.

While FIDE doesn't stop any government from bidding for the prestigious event, it is unusual for two entities from the same country to bid for the tournament.

AICF president Nitin Narang told PTI that the national chess federation has bid for New Delhi as the venue for the title showdown and that a no-objection certificate (NOC) had been taken from the Indian government.

He, however, said that the Tamil Nadu government had not consulted the AICF before sending its bid to FIDE.

"The Tamil Nadu government never consulted the AICF or had any conversation with us about it (Chennai as venue), nor do they have the NOC (from the Government of India) for it," said Narang.

"The New Delhi bid happens to be from the AICF, with the NOC being given by the Government of India," he added.

Gukesh, who hails from Chennai, had become the youngest ever challenger for the world title by winning the Candidates Tournament in Toronto in April.

The basic criteria outlined by FIDE for a prospective bidder for the 2024 edition is a budget of Rs 8.5 million (Rs 71 crore approx) and a facilitation fee of USD 1.1 million (Rs 9 crore) for the global body.

The duration of the tournament is 25 days and approval of regulations will be completed by July 1.

The total prize money awarded by FIDE would be around USD 2.5 million (Rs 20 crore plus) after the fund was increased from the $2 million (₹17 crore) in 2023.

India has hosted the prestigious showpiece in 2000 and 2013.

In the 2000 edition, Viswanathan Anand claimed the first of his five world titles by winning the event played in a tournament format with 100 players. Anand defeated Alexei Shirov in the final.

In 2013, Anand lost to Norwegian challenger Magnus Carlsen.

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