World Cup Cricket: What the women say

What do international women cricketers – past and present – feel about the World Cup? The Hindu caught up with some of them for their views.

May 30, 2019 02:20 pm | Updated 02:20 pm IST

Trailblazers bowler Harleen Deol reacts during the women's IPL Twenty20 Challenge cricket match between Trialblazers and Velocity at the Sawai Mansingh Stadium in Rajasthan on May 08, 2019.

Trailblazers bowler Harleen Deol reacts during the women's IPL Twenty20 Challenge cricket match between Trialblazers and Velocity at the Sawai Mansingh Stadium in Rajasthan on May 08, 2019.

Harleen Deol, promising young all-rounder who debuted for India recently

I feel India will win the World Cup. England and Australia would be other main contenders. With the return of Warner and Smith, Australia looks really good, while England has a strong batting line-up and a fine pace attack.

Two players who I am particularly keen to watch in England are Dhoni and Virat Kohli. I think India got the right team too; Dinesh Karthik is a good choice, given his experience.

Sophie Devine, New Zealand all-rounder who has also represented her country in hockey

New Zealand's Sophie Devine snapped during the first match of the Twenty20 International women's cricket series between India and New Zealand at M. Chinnaswamy Stadium in Bengaluru on July 11, 2015.

New Zealand's Sophie Devine snapped during the first match of the Twenty20 International women's cricket series between India and New Zealand at M. Chinnaswamy Stadium in Bengaluru on July 11, 2015.

 

It is going to be an exciting tournament with many strong contenders. England at home is a favourite certainly. They have been consistent over the last couple of years. India and Australia are teams you can never write off.

The Aussies were great at the IPL, especially Warner. He was scoring runs for fun. The return of Steve Smith and Warner could be scary for the bowlers.

Australia, England, New Zealand and India are my semifinalists, but I feel Pakistan and South Africa have the potential to make it to the final.

Melanie Jones, former Australian cricketer-turned-commentator

Melanie Jones, Australian cricketer-turned-commentator.

Melanie Jones, Australian cricketer-turned-commentator.

 

It is hard to go past England. Their biggest challenge will be the weight of expectation from the nation. They seem to tick all the boxes. And they have some x-factors too, like Jofra Archer.

It is difficult to pick up the top four. Once the top four get in there, it is almost anyone's tournament.

India has done well over the last couple of years and are led exceptionally well. They have senior players who have done it before. They have got some young players as well.

You have M.S. Dhoni in the middle order, and Jasprit Bumrah is one of the best bowlers going around.

The Australians are on their way back, after being pretty up and down for the last 18 months. The five seamers Australia could do the job for Australia.

I won't count teams like West Indies and Pakistan out. Jason Holder, Chris Gayle and Andre Russell could take West Indies far. I am also looking forward to see how Rashid Khan could inspire Bangladesh causing some upsets. New Zealand's captain Kane Williamson is another player who could have a big say.

Lisa Sthalekar, former Australian captain and commentator who was born in India

Australia's Lisa Sthalekar celebrates after taking the wicket of England's Charlotte Edwards during the Twenty20 World Cup women final match Colombo, October 7, 2012.

Australia's Lisa Sthalekar celebrates after taking the wicket of England's Charlotte Edwards during the Twenty20 World Cup women final match Colombo, October 7, 2012.

 

I think this could be the most open World Cup ever. England in home conditions will go in as favourites. India is a strong contender, too.

I feel bowlers will play a crucial role. Mitchell Starc and Bumrah could be the players to watch out for, along with Rashid Khan.

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