Society

Laughing stock

Aadar Malik recently performed at The Park, bringing waves of laughter to the city

“Oh you can see! Mujhe laga andha hai, braille mein gaali dene wala tha,” says Aadar Malik and goes on strumming his guitar to bring out the frustration of traffic. The song, called ‘the driving song’ left the audience laughing hard at the experiences that he shared through the musical composition.

Malik recently performed at The Park as a part of a stand-up comedy session organised by Vizag Komedians. Hailing from a musical family, Malik is Anu Maliks’s nephew and he does not shy away from saying that. “Hi I am Aadar Malik, I am Anu Malik’s nephew and that is the punchline” — is his way to own up the fact that being related to Anu Malik can be perceived as a joke itself. Limelight is not new for Aadar as he has been on the stage from childhood, first as an actor, then musician and now comedian.

Malik’s introduction to comedy was not through stand-up sessions , but from a play in which he portrayed a comical role.“I started as an actor and then moved to comedy. When I was doing comedy initially, there was no indication that this could be a career but today it is. I have come a long way from seeing it as a hobby take it up as a profession,” he says.

The show lived up to its hype. The line-up that included Saikiran, Manik Mehta, Shikha Singh and Yash Choudhary, who made the audience laugh with their unique preceptive on relatable life experiences.

Malik, spoke on various topics ranging from Ganapati dance and maddening traffic to being bro-zoned, says, “I mostly talk about the things that annoy me or make me happy and I find many people sharing similar experiences. Arre yeh toh mere saath bhi hua tha is what makes people laugh and connect with you,” he said. He reveals inspiration about the jokes on Ganapati dance and Navaratri music, “I used to work with my dad’s event management company. When everyone was dancing and having fun and I was behind those huge speakers. I could do nothing but observe,” he said.

Most of Malik’s acts have an underlying theme of Indian mannerisms and religion. Religion did not play a major role in his life while growing up as his parents belonged to different communities and did not believe imposing religion on their children. This factor has helped him gain a different perspective about religion.

He says that his multilingual upbringing has helped him in connecting with a larger audience. To avoid saturation, Malik, connects with more people, he say, “that can be done when we use regional language, when in Pune, I always use Marathi phrases, and the audience loves it.”

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Printable version | Mar 30, 2020 6:00:48 PM | https://www.thehindu.com/society/loony-tunes/article24152274.ece

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