Technology

Tech firms ask U.S. Supreme Court to block Texas social media law

FILE PHOTO: Facebook, Google and Twitter logos are seen in this combination photo from Reuters files.

FILE PHOTO: Facebook, Google and Twitter logos are seen in this combination photo from Reuters files. | Photo Credit: Reuters

Lobbying groups representing Facebook, Twitter, Google and other tech companies filed an emergency request with the U.S. Supreme Court on Friday, seeking to block a Texas law that prohibits large social media platforms from banning users based on their political views.

(Sign up to our Technology newsletter, Today’s Cache, for insights on emerging themes at the intersection of technology, business and policy. Click here to subscribe for free.)

The Texas law went into effect on Wednesday when the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals granted the state's request for a stay of a district judge's injunction blocking the law.

The law forbids social media companies with more than 50 million active users per month from banning members based on their political views and requires them to publicly disclose how they moderate content.

It was signed into law by Texas Governor Greg Abbott, a Republican, in September.

Internet lobbying groups NetChoice and the Computer & Communications Industry Association filed a lawsuit against the measure, and U.S. District Judge Robert Pitman in Austin, Texas, issued a preliminary injunction in December.

Pitman had found that the law would harm social media companies' free speech rights under the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution.

The tech groups, in their emergency request, asked the Supreme Court to "allow the District Court's careful reasoning to remain in effect while an orderly appellate process plays out."


Our code of editorial values

  1. Comments will be moderated by The Hindu editorial team.
  2. Comments that are abusive, personal, incendiary or irrelevant cannot be published.
  3. Please write complete sentences. Do not type comments in all capital letters, or in all lower case letters, or using abbreviated text. (example: u cannot substitute for you, d is not 'the', n is not 'and').
  4. We may remove hyperlinks within comments.
  5. Please use a genuine email ID and provide your name, to avoid rejection.

Printable version | May 16, 2022 6:10:54 pm | https://www.thehindu.com/sci-tech/technology/tech-firms-ask-us-supreme-court-to-block-texas-social-media-law/article65418694.ece